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Thread: 91-96 OEM Clutch Kit - $620 from Amazon!!

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    91-96 OEM Clutch Kit - $620 from Amazon!!

    I stumbled upon this for anyone who is on the fence for a clutch replacement on their 91-96 NSX.

    http://www.amazon.com/Acura-22000-PR.../dp/B003XT1GZS

    Part number matches the OEM clutch kit. Does not including the release bearing ($150). All other online Honda parts dealers are quoting $1300+ which makes this $620 offer a real steal.

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    Registered User IMS_NA1's Avatar
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    Wow thats a steal!

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    Registered User nsxot1c's Avatar
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    Definitely an insane deal. Just ordered one... my current clutch has lasted me since 2004ish (I have no idea how, thanks Larry B!!!). Hope this deal is not too good to be true!!

    Thanks so much for sharing!!
    Chris
    OEM Lime Green Metallic NSX

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    Registered User laurent1475's Avatar
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    Does he ship to France?
    1995 Berlina black NSX - 51000 miles

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    Registered User Rusted_nailz's Avatar
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    too good to be true guys. My order got cancelled.

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    Registered User BATMANs's Avatar
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    Isn't it cheaper to upgrade to 97+ single disc clutch? One of the previous owners of my 93 NSX had that upgraded and it was handling 430rwhp~ with about 15%~ clutch left without slipping when I supercharged it.

    In other words it has the OEM pedal feel and is a clutch that can grow with most of your power needs.
    World Record lowest price to mileage ratio NSX - bought in 2007 for $24k with 35k miles
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    Registered User nsxot1c's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rusted_nailz View Post
    too good to be true guys. My order got cancelled.
    x2. Sucks!
    Chris
    OEM Lime Green Metallic NSX

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    sorry guys, looks like a "pricing error"...got everyone hard for no reason...

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    Charter Champion Larry Bastanza's Avatar
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    That is too much, now it is $1300! Plus you need to add the Throw out bearing at about $175

    - - - Updated - - -

    Quote Originally Posted by BATMANs View Post
    Isn't it cheaper to upgrade to 97+ single disc clutch? One of the previous owners of my 93 NSX had that upgraded and it was handling 430rwhp~ with about 15%~ clutch left without slipping when I supercharged it.

    In other words it has the OEM pedal feel and is a clutch that can grow with most of your power needs.
    I really think you need to have a look at the pricing. You need the $2000 flywheel for that!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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    Charter Gold Nero Tenebre's Avatar
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    I never understood why that crappy oem flywheel was so expensive for the single disc. Why can't you just use a $300 fidanza flywheel with that and it weighs 7lbs?

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    Registered User BATMANs's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Larry Bastanza View Post
    I really think you need to have a look at the pricing. You need the $2000 flywheel for that!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    DOH! I was mis-informed then..... that bastard....
    World Record lowest price to mileage ratio NSX - bought in 2007 for $24k with 35k miles
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    Charter Champion Larry Bastanza's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nero Tenebre View Post
    I never understood why that crappy oem flywheel was so expensive for the single disc. Why can't you just use a $300 fidanza flywheel with that and it weighs 7lbs?
    The flywheel is a dual-mass flywheel, VERY expensive. A lesson from Porsche. And you cannot use the cheaper version due to the clutch disk design. Basically forget all that and get an SoS for 1997+ NSX's.

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    NSXPrime Platinum RYU's Avatar
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    OR win the lottery and change your input shaft so you can use the twin disc clutches!

    You can't use the Fidanza LWFW on the 97+ 6spd unless you change the input shaft IIRC.

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    Registered User Hapa88's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RYU View Post
    OR win the lottery and change your input shaft so you can use the twin disc clutches!

    You can't use the Fidanza LWFW on the 97+ 6spd unless you change the input shaft IIRC.
    Or just buy the new NSX when it comes out. It should have a brand new transmission in it.
    -Adrian
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    Registered User jmarksnsx's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Larry Bastanza View Post
    The flywheel is a dual-mass flywheel, VERY expensive. A lesson from Porsche. And you cannot use the cheaper version due to the clutch disk design. Basically forget all that and get an SoS for 1997+ NSX's.
    That is my plan.
    1997 Acura NSX-T Spa Yellow/Black

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    Charter Gold Honcho's Avatar
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    Honestly not sure about the LWFW. I have driven a few NSXs with this mod and all it seems to do is make the car rev faster and harder to get going on hills and at parking speeds. I didn't notice any performance improvement, except for rev-matching downshifts. I learned way back when that the flywheel is really an energy storage device and a heavier flywheel will make the car easier to drive, since there is a store of momentum on tap to help get the car moving.
    1991 NSX Berlina Black / Ivory
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    NSXPrime Platinum RYU's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Honcho View Post
    Honestly not sure about the LWFW. I have driven a few NSXs with this mod and all it seems to do is make the car rev faster and harder to get going on hills and at parking speeds. I didn't notice any performance improvement, except for rev-matching downshifts. I learned way back when that the flywheel is really an energy storage device and a heavier flywheel will make the car easier to drive, since there is a store of momentum on tap to help get the car moving.
    There's a balance and you're right.. it stores momentum but that also robs energy as it builds that momentum. A LWFW shows gains on the dyno and allows the motor to hit redline in a shorter amount of time. Is it measurable to the butt dyno? Only for some people.

    I wouldn't recommend a LWFW to a casual street driver. Like you said.. it can be a PITA. There's also less of a difference on a 5spd twin disc. The 6spd has a heavier flywheel however and it is quite annoying (for me) when you want to rev match... the short close ratio gears also aggravates this problem because you're inclined to downshift more of the time.

    Part of the NA2s refinement was to add a heavier flywheel and alternatively, it's why I prefer the marginally more "raw" NA1.

    IMHO: A LWFW is a no brainer improvement though to compliment a car that is on the athletic side with its mods and weight reduction initiatives.

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    NSXPrime Platinum JD Cross's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RYU View Post
    There's a balance and you're right.. it stores momentum but that also robs energy as it builds that momentum. A LWFW shows gains on the dyno and allows the motor to hit redline in a shorter amount of time. Is it measurable to the butt dyno? Only for some people.
    Actually a flywheel stores power from the engine.
    It uses engine power to spin and the heavier the flywheel the more energy it will take to spin it and the more energy it will store when it's spinning.
    A LWFW will use less energy to spin so an engine will rev quicker and will slow down quicker when the throttle is closed.

    The only performance gains a LWFW offers is the savings in mass of the flywheel (7-8 lbs.?) which would translate into some small differences.
    It would likely have the same effect as installing a wheel that was 7-8 less than oem.
    Original owner 1991 Black/black
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    Charter Gold Nero Tenebre's Avatar
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    Which is huge and noticeable. I notice 2lb differences in wheels on the NSX

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    NSXPrime Platinum RYU's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JD Cross View Post
    Actually a flywheel stores power from the engine.
    It uses engine power to spin and the heavier the flywheel the more energy it will take to spin it and the more energy it will store when it's spinning.
    A LWFW will use less energy to spin so an engine will rev quicker and will slow down quicker when the throttle is closed.

    The only performance gains a LWFW offers is the savings in mass of the flywheel (7-8 lbs.?) which would translate into some small differences.
    It would likely have the same effect as installing a wheel that was 7-8 less than oem.
    I believe the intent of what I was saying is the same. I'm not an engineer by trade so no doubt I may not be using the appropriate technical words. Thanks for clarifying.

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    Registered User Wavey1's Avatar
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    I've built a few engines (none NSX) using the principles described in engineer David Vizard's books. This is not NSX-specific, but here's his explanation of the benefits of a lightened flywheel:

    "A lighter flywheel neither increases power nor makes the car faster. It does, however, allow the car to accelerate faster because of the reduced mass which the engine has to speed up. The lower gear the car is in the greater the effect of the reduced flywheel weight. To clarify the point, let us assume that we have reduced the effective weight of a flywheel by 10 lb. While the car is in bottom gear the engine RPM to driven wheel RPM is 16 to 1, i.e. the engine turns 16 revs to the wheel’s one rev. The 10 lb. flywheel weight reduction is equivalent to reducing the weight of the car by 16 x 10 lbs which is 160 lb. When we change to second gear which, we will say, is about 12 to 1 overall ratio, the gain, because of the lighter flywheel, will be 12x10 lbs. which is 120 lbs. By the time we get to top gear, the effect of the lighter flywheel will only be about the same as lightening the whole car by 4x10lbs. or 40 lbs. With some exceptions the effective weight saving will not-be as great as 10 lbs. A more likely figure is between 6-8 lbs., but this is enough to make a noticeable difference. By way of a bonus, the lighter flywheel also enables snappy gear changing when downshifting."

    I've had a few vehicles (street and track, cars and motorcycles) with lightened flywheels and I'd say the change makes the car feel more like a high HP/low torque engine (think Honda S2000) VS the reverse. You need to rev a bit more to get the car moving, but the difference in acceleration is noticeable. I just like the faster revving and return to idle too. With engines that are pretty torquey to begin with (think Porsche 911), it's a nice change because the low-end torque still helps smooth things out. In some cars you will get more gearbox rattle at idle (Porsche 911s for sure, either 915 or G50 transmissions) because the flywheel effect also pre-loads the entire grear train. Not harmful but can be a bit annoying.
    Formula Red '92 with '96 wheels, B&B exhaust and Wings West front spoiler. Otherwise totally OEM.

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    NSXPrime Platinum JD Cross's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wavey1 View Post
    I've built a few engines (none NSX) using the principles described in engineer David Vizard's books. This is not NSX-specific, but here's his explanation of the benefits of a lightened flywheel:

    "A lighter flywheel neither increases power nor makes the car faster. It does, however, allow the car to accelerate faster because of the reduced mass which the engine has to speed up. The lower gear the car is in the greater the effect of the reduced flywheel weight. To clarify the point, let us assume that we have reduced the effective weight of a flywheel by 10 lb. While the car is in bottom gear the engine RPM to driven wheel RPM is 16 to 1, i.e. the engine turns 16 revs to the wheel’s one rev. The 10 lb. flywheel weight reduction is equivalent to reducing the weight of the car by 16 x 10 lbs which is 160 lb. When we change to second gear which, we will say, is about 12 to 1 overall ratio, the gain, because of the lighter flywheel, will be 12x10 lbs. which is 120 lbs. By the time we get to top gear, the effect of the lighter flywheel will only be about the same as lightening the whole car by 4x10lbs. or 40 lbs. With some exceptions the effective weight saving will not-be as great as 10 lbs. A more likely figure is between 6-8 lbs., but this is enough to make a noticeable difference. By way of a bonus, the lighter flywheel also enables snappy gear changing when downshifting."

    I've had a few vehicles (street and track, cars and motorcycles) with lightened flywheels and I'd say the change makes the car feel more like a high HP/low torque engine (think Honda S2000) VS the reverse. You need to rev a bit more to get the car moving, but the difference in acceleration is noticeable. I just like the faster revving and return to idle too. With engines that are pretty torquey to begin with (think Porsche 911), it's a nice change because the low-end torque still helps smooth things out. In some cars you will get more gearbox rattle at idle (Porsche 911s for sure, either 915 or G50 transmissions) because the flywheel effect also pre-loads the entire grear train. Not harmful but can be a bit annoying.
    What a terrific explanation!
    I've learned a lot from it.
    Thanks
    Original owner 1991 Black/black
    NSXCA Northwest Region Representative

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    Charter Champion Larry Bastanza's Avatar
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    I agree, great explanation.

    But I am having trouble understanding this part:

    "By way of a bonus, the lighter flywheel also enables snappy gear changing when downshifting."

    I am thinking the revs drop quicker, so on the downshift it would take a little more throttle to match revs, or since the flywheel is lighter it would even out and be about the same, but not "snappier" as he puts it.

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    Registered User Wavey1's Avatar
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    Yeah, I think he was trying to say the second thing, that the revs match more quickly and easily.
    Formula Red '92 with '96 wheels, B&B exhaust and Wings West front spoiler. Otherwise totally OEM.

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    NSXPrime Platinum RYU's Avatar
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    I think it's come to a point in all these fantastic technical explanations that for folks interested in a LWFW they just need to try a car with one. Try it on a race track or a brisk canyon road. The experience is stronger than the bench racing in this case

    If you have a NA2 6spd you're in for a treat.

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