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Anti-Seize On Wheel Studs?

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I was perusing the T3TEC instagram page and came across a picture where they were doing a complete suspension refresh on a NA1 NSX-R. Very cool stuff to see all that shiny new aluminum alloy, but something else caught my eye. It appeared that they put about 10 mm worth of copper anti-seize on the wheel studs of the new hubs.

ACtC-3fpRprCEmg7MajQ8T_DF13NEdIi-HGKiGGva8FxIWU4f3XfakwWSJ_bH5TR3OLguSCDvpDzzXtGh_j90lae2Q-NSWxdz5hozUCzrYyEoeZdxhSKsAsn7bz8R4lIqDWq2W0xakQAvSp-Yw1zWyfGrtPH=w760-h751-no


That got me thinking, why lube the threads? It would change the torque. That led me to this extremely helpful video. It suggests some lubrication may be helpful on old or weathered threads to achieve the designed clamping load from the manufacturer. It also implies that we all might be driving around on wheels that are not clamped to the minimum tightness! I may try just a touch of anti-seize on my studs, as they are a bit rough, but leave the cone seating surface dry.

However, this still doesn't explain why T3TEC would use lube on new studs. Any ideas why?

 
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goldNSX

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I may try just a touch of anti-seize on my studs, as they are a bit rough, but leave the cone seating surface dry.
That's the key here. The seating surface should be free of any grease. If you use too much grease, it'll work its way on the seating surface as well. Less is more here. Copper grease is quite hard to distribute without having too much of it in the threads. I use it on several spots as a first step and wipe the excess grease off with a towel by turning it along the threads two or three times.
 
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Anti seize on new threads might help prevent your problem - old rough threads. If the cars are driven a lot in wet conditions that may be a consideration, particularly if they are using those trendy open ended lug nuts as opposed to the more pedestrian closed end nut. They would just have to be mindful to reduce the applied torque - assuming the torque specs are for a dry thread.
 
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I was perusing the T3TEC instagram page and came across a picture where they were doing a complete suspension refresh on a NA1 NSX-R. Very cool stuff to see all that shiny new aluminum alloy, but something else caught my eye. It appeared that they put about 10 mm worth of copper anti-seize on the wheel studs of the new hubs.

ACtC-3fpRprCEmg7MajQ8T_DF13NEdIi-HGKiGGva8FxIWU4f3XfakwWSJ_bH5TR3OLguSCDvpDzzXtGh_j90lae2Q-NSWxdz5hozUCzrYyEoeZdxhSKsAsn7bz8R4lIqDWq2W0xakQAvSp-Yw1zWyfGrtPH=w760-h751-no


That got me thinking, why lube the threads? It would change the torque. That led me to this extremely helpful video. It suggests some lubrication may be helpful on old or weathered threads to achieve the designed clamping load from the manufacturer. It also implies that we all might be driving around on wheels that are not clamped to the minimum tightness! I may try just a touch of anti-seize on my studs, as they are a bit rough, but leave the cone seating surface dry.

However, this still doesn't explain why T3TEC would use lube on new studs. Any ideas why?




this is like comparing apples and oranges ,construction hardware vs. automotive hardware . What he is showing is the coefficient of friction ,antiseize does not belong on lug nuts . You can use it but you have to adjust your torque accordingly , the reason for using it has to be very specific .
 
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I agree anti-seize on lug nuts is a bad idea. I have seen too many ruined studs caused by dirt and metal shavings caught in the anti-seize compound, deformed threads caused by over torquing, loose lug nuts etc. Replacing lug studs is not quick and easy so unless rust is a problem clean dry threads are the way to go.
 
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IMO clean and dry is the way to go. If there's any significant corrosion or damage either a wire wheel or the nuclear option an M12x1.5 die would both work great to clean them up.
 
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I haven't really found it necessary. Maybe if you ran with open ended lugs and didn't take your wheels off for many years... but that is almost never the case. If you were to use anti-seize I would say as little as possible.

But yes, interesting video. I'm wondering if titanium studs and lugs would solve that problem. I know people prefer steel due to the heat characteristics of expansion while driving but I haven't seen any definitive answers (besides from my wallet) on the issue.
 
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Thanks everyone for the input- I think I might just run my M12 x 1.5 chase over the threads to make sure they are clean. Then, just torque 'em dry.
 
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I always put graphite grease on my wheels studs. Never had problem in more than 20 years (street and track). I would never do without, especially if / because you have a different casting or material between the studs and the nuts. You have a risk of seizing while tightening. In which case you don't know if your nut is correctly tightened or just seized. Grease also help against humidity wich can cause a local battery effect between the two different material.
 
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