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Does the NSX have LSD?

ST

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And no..not the drug!
smile.gif


Though I realize how razor sharp and tossable the handling on the NSX is stock already, I'm curious if the NSX has any sort of limited slip differential? I don't see it in any accompanying official Acura specs. If not, why?
 

ST

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Sorry to say, but that doesn't mean much, I've done that with a Maxima that doesn't have it also.

If it does, I wonder if it is of the viscous, torsen, or clutch type variety?


Originally posted by David:
I burn out both tires, so I think it must be limited slip.
 

Edo

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I think I remember reading in that silver/black hardover NSX book that it has a Torsen differential..I could be wrong though..
 

ST

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Could you please elaborate, "not a true LSD". Torsen, or torque sensing types are limited slip differentials. They have great characteristics in terms of power delivery and usage over similar viscous type coupling, but can be rather harsh in their bite when they kick in (I have had a couple of Supra TT's with them). I assume the aftermarket ones are the clutch type...really nice, but wear quicker and are more expensive.

Originally posted by maomaonsx:
The NSX has a torsen type differential, not a true LSD. There are up-grades to 1.5 way LSDs from Mugen and ATS. Cost from $2800~4500...

 

Edo

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There is a difference on how they perform? THats very interesting. Does anyone want to volunteer to give us "greenies" a LSD lesson?
I think my Mustang Cobra had a clutch type..and for the life of me I cant tell a difference. I blew the LSD clutch on it once and the only way I could tell was that I could burn rubber more easily.
And What on Earth makes a Torsen differential a Torsen differential?
 
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The Torsen differential is a very clever design that uses gears, instead of clutch plates, to ration the torque between the axles.

Here's a white paper that explains how it works...
http://www.zhome.com/ZCMnL/tech/Torsen/Torsen.htm

-Jim



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1991 NSX Blk/Blk
1974 Vette 454 4 spd
Wht/Blk
 

Edo

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Ok, I just went to that page. The explanation is VERY technical. I understood most of it I think. In any case, it is my understanding that there are 3? types of differentials? a Clutch type, a Torsen diffeential, and a "Locker" type. Are there any other types out there?
 
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Edo,

I think that's it...those 3 types. The Torsen is neat because unlike the more common clutch plate designs there's very little to go wrong or to wear out.

-Jim

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1991 NSX Blk/Blk
1974 Vette 454 4 spd
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Lud

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All the older cars as well as the newer automatic cars have Honda's "Torque Control Differential" which uses a multi-plate clutch and planetary gearset.

Like many conventional LSD (Limited Slip Differential) systems, this unit resists the rotational speed difference between the rear wheels and attempts to maintain the same rate of rotation at both wheels. But unlike most units, the amount of additional torque resisting the rotational difference is limited to 16 kg-m.

This reduces understeer by not trying to keep the car from going towards the direction in which it is being steered. In a cornering situation, too much torque transfer to the inside rear wheel tends to oppose the turning moment from the front wheels, thereby increasing understeer.

This system also helps it maintain directional stability in a cross-wind. If the NSX is acted upon by a cross-wind, the differential senses the differences in rotational speed of the wheels and automatically compensates.

Compared to both conventional open differentials and limited slip differentials, straight line tracking is improved, especially in crosswinds. On a split friction road surface, the acceleration time is reduced compared to a conventional open differential.

The newer manual transmission cars have what Honds calls a "Torque Reactive Differential." It uses a multi-plate clutch system and helical-type planetary gears to limit wheelspin on the inside wheel when the car is powering out of a tight corner. This helps retain more control of the vehicle and helps it go around a corner quicker.
 
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Lud,

Your technical description of LSD in the NSX explains very well my experiences in very strong crosswinds in the Nevada/California desert last week. My wife and I were zooming along on Hwy 95 at 80 mph, and we were astonished at how the car was absolutely rock stable in 40-60 mph crosswinds. It was literally as if there was no wind at all!! At the time I just thought it was because of the car's streamlined profile, but that's clearly not the full explanation. This car's engineering is just nothing short of amazing! Am I ever glad I bought this car! The NSX is like nothing I have ever driven: not even close! I get cramps in my face from smiling while I drive.

NSXY
 

Lud

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Originally posted by Andrie Hartanto:
Lud, what do they mean when they adjust the diff pack, when they do short gears? What are the specs and what is the puprpose?

I'm not sure I understand what you are asking. What does "adjust the diff pack" mean? If you are referring to increasing the preset torque then the goal is simply to increase the amount the two wheels are "locked together."

I do not think there is much reason to do this unless the car has been heavily modified so it's producing a lot more power than stock or unless you are experiencing excessive inside wheel spin when powering out of turns (probably at the track). For a mostly stock car that is mainly driven on the street I think most people are fine with the factory setup.

Even in that case the first thing I'd check before upgrading is to make sure the car was near the top-end of the spec. The factory spec is a pretty wide range; 43-101 lb-ft. Most cars I know of that people have checked fall in the lower to middle part of that range but some are in the 50s or lower. In that case it is likely that you would want to increase it, especially if you have added power.

The Type-R differential spring plate will put you around 105+ lb-ft. This is an additional spring plate from the Type-R model and can be added to the normal differential as long as you change out a couple other fairly minor parts.

There should be no need for this on the newer manual transmission cars because the Torque Reactive Differential is supposed to handle this automatically. I don't think the parts would fit anyway unless you swapped the entire differential for the older style.
 

Edo

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Originally posted by Lud:
All the older cars as well as the newer automatic cars have Honda's "Torque Control Differential" which uses a multi-plate clutch and planetary gearset.

So does this mean that the older Manual trannies have a Clutch type AND Torsen type hybrid?
 

Lud

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Originally posted by Lud:
All the older cars as well as the newer automatic cars have Honda's "Torque Control Differential" which uses a multi-plate clutch and planetary gearset.


Originally posted by Edo:
So does this mean that the older Manual trannies have a Clutch type AND Torsen type hybrid?


No. Torsen systems use worm gear type setup. They don't look like traditional worm gears but that is how they function. I believe Gleason has some trademarked name for their specific design. The gears themselves are limiting the slip in this setup. While friction is involved, the power is not actually transmitted via the friction coupling.

The NSX system is clutch (friction) based and has planetary gears.

[This message has been edited by Lud (edited 06 July 2000).]
 
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