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just bought a 93 =)

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Hello everyone,

I just wanted to share with everyone that Im a new proud owner of a 93 NSX (Formula Red)

I have always been fond on exoticars.In fact my choices was a Ferrari 308, Porsche 930 or Lotus Esprit Turbo. Which I have looking for sometime now. I was never in a market for an NSX until one literally fell on my lap.

Im glad I made this transaction as I was always afraid of high maintenance, reliability of the other exotics.

I dont know much about the NSX so any advise could help.

Before I bought the car, I had it inspected at my local Acura Dealership, where they replaced all the belts and gaskets, the bill came up to $2600 and they say the car is nearly Acura Certified. (just needs touch up on rock chips here and there).

My only concern is power window makes a popping noice when I roll it up.

I dont know to much about the NSX so kindly advice this newby..

thank you,
Rantonio
 
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Im a new proud owner of a 93 NSX (Formula Red)

Congratulations!

I was never in a market for an NSX until one literally fell on my lap.

Literally? Sounds painful.
biggrin.gif


My only concern is power window makes a popping noice when I roll it up.

What you want to do is buy the "window fix-it thingies" from Dali Racing (click here for info) and install them. Don't roll the windows up and down until then, or it could break the cable and turn into a much more expensive repair.

You also should check out the NSX FAQ (answers to Frequently Asked Questions) on this site, at http://www.nsxprime.com/toc.htm In particular, under the "Troubleshooting" heading, read the section called "power windows" which describes this problem and why you need the fix-it thingies. The Acura Technical Service Bulletin on this (which you can read here) tells you to replace the entire regulator, which costs about $400, but the fix-it thingies can fix the problem for a small fraction of the cost.

Again, congratulations!


[This message has been edited by nsxtasy (edited 28 August 2001).]
 
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Congrats on your purchase!

The window popping sounds like your window regulators are going. Check in the FAQ, there's some info in there.

I'm sure someone will reply with a link that'll lead you to it, so not to worry *ahem...ken*

Welcome to the club!
smile.gif




------------------
Richard
NSXTASY
 
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Originally posted by Veleno:
Congrats on your purchase!

The window popping sounds like your window regulators are going.


Actually, per a service bulletin (can't remember #), the popping noise is caused by an inadequately lubed window "follower". The prescribed fix is to lube it with the specified High Temp Urea Grease. I performed this and my windows don't "pop" anymore. The old style window regulator is another issue but is often mistakenly associated with the "popping" noise. In fact a poorly lubed regulator may contribute to the premature failing of the old regulator. Being a '93, it might have the updated regulator?

Just my .02
Welcome to the community Spartan2-3.

Vic
 
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per a service bulletin (can't remember #),

It's service bulletin number 93-004. That's what that link in the previous post points to. In case you didn't notice the link, the URL to view the service bulletin is http://www.nsxprime.com/FAQ/Reference/tsb/tsb-93-004-a.gif

the popping noise is caused by an inadequately lubed window "follower".

No, according to the TSB, it's caused by the spool binding, not by inadequate lubrication.

The prescribed fix is to lube it with the specified High Temp Urea Grease.

No, the prescribed fix is to check out the window regulator, and if it's the old style regulator, to replace it. The only time it mentions the grease is to lubricate the new regulator after installing it.

Note, of course, that Acura can't recommend an aftermarket fix like the Dali Racing window fix-it thingies, even though those can just as effectively cure the problem (with basically the same solution, but by replacing one small part rather than the entire regulator assembly.)

I performed this and my windows don't "pop" anymore.

However, if all you did was apply lubrication, the binding could easily develop on yours again. Next time, you might want to replace the clips with the window fix-it thingies so that they don't bind any more. I'm sure you'll agree that $15 is not too much to spend, if you're going to open the door panels up anyway.

The old style window regulator is another issue but is often mistakenly associated with the "popping" noise.

The title of this service bulletin - the one that advises checking the regulator and replacing it if it's the old style - is "Popping Noise From the Window Regulator". Why do you say that this association is mistaken?

In fact a poorly lubed regulator may contribute to the premature failing of the old regulator.

Certainly, lack of lubrication may contribute to the binding problem. And lubricating it can temporarily cure it. Or, you can install the fix-it thingies for $15 (or replace the regulator for $400) and prevent the binding from recurring for good.

Being a '93, it might have the updated regulator?

The service bulletin applies to all NSX's for 1991-1993. Take a look at it...


[This message has been edited by nsxtasy (edited 28 August 2001).]
 
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Spartan,

DON'T LOWER OR RAISE YOUR WINDOWS until you have it checked out.

If you hear a POP it means an expensive failure is imminent. I know it just happened to me a few months ago.

As mentioned, there's a preventive maintenance fix (the Window Regulator Thingies) that is MUCH less costly than replacing the window regulators. You can also have the appropriate areas cleaned and lubed at that time.

Regards,
Jim

------------------
1992 NSX Red/Blk 5 spd #0330
1991 NSX Blk/Blk Auto #3070 (Sold)
1974 Vette 454 4 spd Wht/Blk
Looking for 76-79 Honda Accords
 
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Thanks everyone for the advice, In fact I went to my local Acura Dealership and purchased the High Temp Urea Grease, then I'll order the fix kit from Mark Johnson $15 is not a bad investment, I hope its not that hard to replace.

thanks for all the support,
spartan2-3

PS m93 has 52k miles and very good shape, I have only log 250 miles since I bought it.
 
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Thanks everyone for the advice, In fact I went to my local Acura Dealership and purchased the High Temp Urea Grease, then I'll order the fix kit from Mark Johnson $15 is not a bad investment, I hope its not that hard to replace.

thanks for all the support,
spartan2-3

PS my 93 has 52k miles and very good shape, I have only log 250 miles since I bought it.
 
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Originally posted by nsxtasy:
per a service bulletin (can't remember #),

It's service bulletin number 93-004.

.. snip ..


[This message has been edited by nsxtasy (edited 28 August 2001).]


NSXTASY,

Yes if I would have looked, I would have seen the TSB in the link; my bad
smile.gif


However at risk of starting another heated discussion, one must not read the TSB's too literally. This TSB actually covers two issues; popping spool AND updating the regulator. It is poorly written.

As indicated in the TSB (and your post) the popping sound comes from a binding plate on the spool. The test shown in the TSB is to ascertain whether the window plate is binding on the spool, not what type of regulator you have in your door. The spool design in the "tab" (old) and "box" (new) type regulators are common. If mal-aligned or under-lubed, the spool on either regulator can start popping.

The redesigned regulator only fixes the weak attachment of the steel pulley cable within the mechanism, not the popping plate on the spool. The $5 grease fixes the binding problem. As long as the cable on the old design is still intact, it is functionally identical to the new design. To hear a popping spool and assume that it is an old regulator when both new and old units have the same mechanism is technically inaccurate.

Doing a root cause analysis of the mechanism will show that the popping spool and the breaking of the cable is mechanically isolated. The only correlation is time, where the spool runs dry of lube over time and the old “tab” retention has time to work loose. In the non-engineering world, we call it “coincidence”.

The '93 which was purchased is used. One cannot automatically conclude that it still has the old regulators just because it's a '93 and the windows are popping. As an example, both the windows on my '92 "popped" 4 years ago; pulled panel; inspected (as TSB says to do); already have new style regulators (with SAME spool design); saw dry spool; lubed dry spool with recommended grease; problem fixed.

I fully agree that if you have an old regulator you should replace it because it will eventually fail. But to assume that it is an old regulator because of a popping dry spool is technically inappropriate. If I would have gone out and spent $700 on regulators without inspecting them first I would have been financially irresponsible.

Humbly,
Vic
 
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I fully agree that if you have an old regulator you should replace it because it will eventually fail. But to assume that it is an old regulator because of a popping dry spool is technically inappropriate. If I would have gone out and spent $700 on regulators without inspecting them first I would have been financially irresponsible.

I think we're pretty much in agreement.

I should have mentioned that it is possible that the '93 has the newer design - not only that it's possible that it had it in the first place, but it's also possible that the regulator had been replaced (or the fix-it thingies installed) by a previous owner.

However, even if it does have the older regulator, you don't need to replace the entire regulator if it hasn't completely failed yet; installing the inexpensive fix-it thingies will suffice. So there's no need to spend the big bucks on new regulators. And even if you're not sure you need them, the $15 spent to have the fix-it thingies in hand when you open up the door panel to check is a small price to pay if it turns out you don't need them.

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Originally posted by nsxtasy:
I fully agree that if you have an old regulator you should replace it because it will eventually fail. But to assume that it is an old regulator because of a popping dry spool is technically inappropriate. If I would have gone out and spent $700 on regulators without inspecting them first I would have been financially irresponsible.

I think we're pretty much in agreement.

I should have mentioned that it is possible that the '93 has the newer design - not only that it's possible that it had it in the first place, but it's also possible that the regulator had been replaced (or the fix-it thingies installed) by a previous owner.

However, even if it does have the older regulator, you don't need to replace the entire regulator if it hasn't completely failed yet; installing the inexpensive fix-it thingies will suffice. So there's no need to spend the big bucks on new regulators. And even if you're not sure you need them, the $15 spent to have the fix-it thingies in hand when you open up the door panel to check is a small price to pay if it turns out you don't need them.

cool.gif

Exactly and good points :)

Cheers,
Vic
 
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