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oil pan drain hole leaking

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I'm getting a slow leak from the drain hole of the oil pan. My mechanic said the drain hole is somehow warped, is it even possible?? Will it be fixable??

Henry.
 
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nsxhk said:
I'm getting a slow leak from the drain hole of the oil pan. My mechanic said the drain hole is somehow warped, is it even possible??
Warped? Unlikely. Leaks there are common, but they are usually caused by overtorquing or improperly threading the drain bolt.

nsxhk said:
Will it be fixable??
Yes. It can be re-drilled and fitted with a... a... :redface: Larry B will know the name of the thingie they use when they redrill the drain hole.
 
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nsxtasy said:
Yes. It can be re-drilled and fitted with a... a... :redface: Larry B will know the name of the thingie they use when they redrill the drain hole.
Courtesy of Popular Mechanics:

"There are dozens of oil pan drainhole repair items on the market. Some are better than others. The simplest is an oversize drain plug, which might be okay if the threads are not too stripped. I'm leery of anything that requires tapping new threads unless the pan is off--those metal shavings can be hard to remove. Look for a device like the Thexton part illustrated here. A permanent metal fitting screws in, and seals to the pan with a rubber washer. Subsequent oil drains are accomplished by removing a cap from the fitting, leaving your damaged threads alone. Fram has a similar product that lets you attach a hose to the drain for less spillage.

Relax. If a good repair can be made, there's no reason to make them remove and replace the oil pan, a potentially lengthy and expensive procedure."


oilpan-sm.jpg
 
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Thnx for the info Ken!

I was hoping that there's something wrong with the bolt which a simple bolt replacement will do.

Henry.
 
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Are you sure that you haven't just been reusing the crush washer? It is a one time use item and must be changed every time you change your oil. If it is a very small leak you should be able to drain the oil and inspect the threads very easily and replace the crush washer and see if the leak reappears.

Dali Racing also sells a magnetic plug that traps metal shavings around it that I can recommend.

Good luck...
 
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matteni said:
Are you sure that you haven't just been reusing the crush washer? It is a one time use item and must be changed every time you change your oil. If it is a very small leak you should be able to drain the oil and inspect the threads very easily and replace the crush washer and see if the leak reappears.
Good thought, Nick. Always start with the easiest and cheapest and most likely things first. The crush washer costs a lot less than a dollar (although you have to drain the oil to replace it). A lot of parts places just give them away when you buy oil filters. Oh, and it's a good idea, when you buy filters, to tape a crush washer to each one, so you won't forget it and you won't lose it.

matteni said:
Dali Racing also sells a magnetic plug that traps metal shavings around it that I can recommend.
How does a magnet attract metal shavings? Aren't our engines all aluminum? :confused:
 
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when the drain plug is continually over torqued it will deform the oil pan surface where the crush washer seats. I actually think it twist the welded nut inside the pan and that is what causes the deformity. I have had some success filing or grinding it back flat but have to be very careful and better be sure that is what is wrong. use a staight edge to see if it is still flat. The other alternative is to put a new oil pan on it if this is what is wrong and cant make it flat again. Ive done at least 50 hole repairs or pan replacements on hondas for this problem.
 
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Even though it may be expensive, I think the best fix for an older NSX (91-92) may be to replace the oil pan. This is an opinion from a novice, but its an important issue, and just do it. Of course, you need a good mechanic that you can trust.

The problem will be introducing other problems, like undoing some exhaust pieces. I am facing this now.
 
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Bearings, iron liners, rings, cams, rockers, etc. have ferrous content (the block and heads are the main aluminum content). Since the cams, rod and main bearings are protected by the filter from contamination, keeping up with your regular oil change should be sufficient, although these devices may give you that added level of peace of mind.

Cheers,
-- Chris

nsxtasy said:
Good thought, Nick. Always start with the easiest and cheapest and most likely things first. The crush washer costs a lot less than a dollar (although you have to drain the oil to replace it). A lot of parts places just give them away when you buy oil filters. Oh, and it's a good idea, when you buy filters, to tape a crush washer to each one, so you won't forget it and you won't lose it.

How does a magnet attract metal shavings? Aren't our engines all aluminum? :confused:
 
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A new crush washer was used, I saw it. It's not leaking that badly tho. Maybe a few drops a night.

I think it's mostly due to my mechanic overtorging :(

Deforming the oil pan surface where the crush washer seats? With a wrench?? Is the oil pan that flimsy???

Henry.
 
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MarkB said:
I believe you will find that all OEM oil pans are sensitive to 'overtorquing' issues.

Mark, you're right on with your comment, I had an 88 Legend Coupe, took it to an "Express Oil Change" franchise, started leaking oil immediately. Took it back to Acura, they showed me where the over-torquing had ruined the pan, the oil change place, took responsibility, and paid for the replacement. Never been back to any of the express change places since!!!! :eek:
 
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I would purchase three things:

1. 11200-PR7-A01 Oil Pan (it comes with a new crush washer and drain plug installed already)
2. 11251-PH7-000 Oil Pan Gasket
3. Torque Wrench

33 ft. lbs. for the drain plug:).

My $.02,
LarryB
 
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i agree with larry on this. as i stated before, it is possible to fix slight problems with the pan not being flat at the mating surface but most of the time the best fix is a new pan. replace it new and you wont be sad and blue. And yes it is very easy to deform the pan with a wrench. Pans are nothing more than thick sheet metal. Price of a new oil pan or eventually a new motor.
 
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Larry Bastanza said:
I would purchase three things:

1. 11200-PR7-A01 Oil Pan (it comes with a new crush washer and drain plug installed already)
2. 11251-PH7-000 Oil Pan Gasket
3. Torque Wrench
You should be able to get (1) and (2) for around USD200.
 
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Henry, if I am not mistaken, yours is a pre 97. With all these offers to help you, you might consider updgrading the oil pan with one that is baffled. It is my understanding from Andrie that if you track your car - and I think you do, the pre 97 (ie NA1 oil pans) have more of a chance/risk/tendency to starve an engine than the NA2. How much more or how often, I don't know but this would be the time to add that safety feature. YMMV.
 
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A short while ago , during an oil/filter change, I discovered my drain bolt wouldn't tighten to the proper torque. I knew I had either a stripped bolt or pan. I had a very slow leak and was researching options when I ran across the Fumoto Drain Valve. I started a thread about it here.

When it came time to remove the drain plug, it turned out the plug itself had the damaged threads. I ran a 14 x 1.5 thread chaser into the oil pan itself to be on the safe side and it threaded with minimal resistance indicating at worse I had very little or no thread damage. The Fumoto Valve installed fine. I used an OEM crush washer and torqued it to 22 lb/ft which is more than enough since the crush washer crushes at 18 lb/ft and this left the section of the Fumuto that protrudes in a desirable position. (Not pointing down)

The Fumoto website is here. I used part number F-106.

It's been in the car about a month now with no issues. I average about 3000 miles/month so I'm almost due for another oil change. I'm looking forward to actually using the Fumoto for the first time which will make the process even easier than it already is.
 
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Hrant said:
Henry, if I am not mistaken, yours is a pre 97. With all these offers to help you, you might consider updgrading the oil pan with one that is baffled. It is my understanding from Andrie that if you track your car - and I think you do, the pre 97 (ie NA1 oil pans) have more of a chance/risk/tendency to starve an engine than the NA2. How much more or how often, I don't know but this would be the time to add that safety feature. YMMV.

I am already using a baffled oil pan, that's why I'm trying to find ways to fit it. Thnx for the tip tho ;)

Henry.
 
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