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Price of a supercharged NSX????

Joined
6 July 2012
Messages
138
Location
Los Angeles
When buying a NSX that is supercharged, what percentage of the price of the supercharger should be added to the kbb value price, or average selling price of similar year NSXs? In other words, how much of a markup price is appropriate?
 
I am guessing it depends.

For me I paid about 6k more than my target. I wanted a near stock unit so I could modify to my liking. I am sure happy my car had/has a ctsc. This thing is a BLAST TO DRIVE!!
 
ok so 5 to 6. I do understand though that pricing is completely up to the seller. Just wanted some input on what people think is considered reasonable. This also helps me in budgeting myself.
 
well if i may use one nsx that i was interested a while back. its fs on here. its a 92 with 106k+ miles on it. kbb and other nsx's fs in that year range in the low 20's. this particular one is fs for 43k. it has other mods, but in my honest opinion, i dont think they're worth that much to sell for that asking price. more than kbb for sure, but not 43k.
 
Some people only want a stock car so a SC will turn them off to that car. For me, I had to have one and they cost 11k new. I would say 5k above NA is what I would pay.
 
What about a built FI engine and supercharger?
What would that do to the price?

Personal preference obviously, but I would not pay anymore for a built motor and in fact might steer away from a NSX with a built motor. A Comptech based SC is a known quantity but not all motor builds are created equal. Just because the parts are stronger does not mean it will last longer. I have a lot of friends that have had built motor failures due to either defective parts or bad assembly practices.
 
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well if i may use one nsx that i was interested a while back. its fs on here. its a 92 with 106k+ miles on it. kbb and other nsx's fs in that year range in the low 20's. this particular one is fs for 43k. it has other mods, but in my honest opinion, i dont think they're worth that much to sell for that asking price. more than kbb for sure, but not 43k.
IMHO Kelley Blue Book is a horrible gauge for specialty cars like the NSX. It's a great tool for your bread and butter Honda Accord where the majority are unmodified and due to sheer volume and consistency between examples it's easy to derive an accurate average price.

The sample size for the NSX is much too small and each sample varies greatly in price and condition. KBB will show an average but in fact, your sample population will be filled with outliers.
 
IMHO Kelley Blue Book is a horrible gauge for specialty cars like the NSX. It's a great tool for your bread and butter Honda Accord where the majority are unmodified and due to sheer volume and consistency between examples it's easy to derive an accurate average price.

The sample size for the NSX is much too small and each sample varies greatly in price and condition. KBB will show an average but in fact, your sample population will be filled with outliers.

Idk how exactly kbb calculates their resale prices so I can't really say I agree nor disagree with what you say, but it does makes sense. But after comparing prices of NSXs for sale and kbb values, they're fairly close (like 5-7k difference, mainly underpriced on kbb website). This is what initially brought up my question about the supercharger. Does is really make much of a price difference. I know they cost a lot of money, up to 10k right? Plus install and tune. I guess I was just wondering if it made sense add the full cost of a supercharger when selling a NSX. Maybe it is like you said, there are "outliers". Problem is that those are the only ones I've seen. lol
 
I used this one from Hagerty when I was looking. http://www.hagerty.com/valuationtools/HVT/VehicleSearch
But keep in mind book values are just a gauge...a car is only worth what you can get/ will pay for one on any given day. Mods can hurt the value as much as help it..if they are not what the buyer is looking for.

wow, that's pretty good. Shows higher prices, maybe more accurate too. I like how they give graphs on how pricing has changed throughout time.
 
Idk how exactly kbb calculates their resale prices so I can't really say I agree nor disagree with what you say, but it does makes sense. But after comparing prices of NSXs for sale and kbb values, they're fairly close (like 5-7k difference, mainly underpriced on kbb website). This is what initially brought up my question about the supercharger. Does is really make much of a price difference. I know they cost a lot of money, up to 10k right? Plus install and tune. I guess I was just wondering if it made sense add the full cost of a supercharger when selling a NSX. Maybe it is like you said, there are "outliers". Problem is that those are the only ones I've seen. lol
I can respect this argument and don't doubt your findings. I'm not sure what type of person you are but i'm a guy that takes everything they read on forums with a grain of salt.

My only recommendation is patience and research with purchasing this type of car. It's not really a commodity like most other cars. This car is also quite versatile wherein some owners are collectors (car never gets driven) while some are using it for daily driving (due to it's high reliability). I spent 5 months looking for mine. I should have spent 12-24months. I could have gotten a HUGE bargain on a unit with tasteful mods I would have done if I had just waited.

It's also important to try to nail down some of your goals for the vehicle. I know it's virtually impossible to know without ever owning one but thru the years i've seen several NSXs for sale here that i've seen progress thru various stages or restorations or builds. With the common trait of the owners spending a lot of $$$ in the process but then turn around and sell for a fraction of the replacement costs. You can pick up one at a discount as opposed to going thru the mod/restoration yourself - this is a guarantee.

Keep in mind, the NSX is not your average Honda tuner car. Most owners are reluctant to just throw on ABC XYZ part (though, sadly this is changing). Most owners I know research each part heavily and often have it professionally installed or install it themselves meticulously with even greater attention than most mechanics (tooting my own horn here!). This is my general observation.
 
@RYU, I'm sorta patient. My problem is my budget constraint. I have enough for an "ok/stock" NSX right now, which I'm perfectly fine with. If I could, I'd go for a 2002 or above, but I don't qualify for a loan at the moment due to the fact that I have another car in my name that's still being paid for. I dug through this website and found a thread where it said that it could take anywhere from 6 months to 2 years to find the "perfect" NSX for you. I've only searched for about 2 months, so I still got a long way to go.

@funkynsx, that's another good question. Would a lower mileage engine that was put in make the car worth more or less?
 
@RYU, I'm sorta patient. My problem is my budget constraint. I have enough for an "ok/stock" NSX right now, which I'm perfectly fine with. If I could, I'd go for a 2002 or above, but I don't qualify for a loan at the moment due to the fact that I have another car in my name that's still being paid for. I dug through this website and found a thread where it said that it could take anywhere from 6 months to 2 years to find the "perfect" NSX for you. I've only searched for about 2 months, so I still got a long way to go.

@funkynsx, that's another good question. Would a lower mileage engine that was put in make the car worth more or less?
It it was me, i'd dig deeper. What was the cause for the engine swap? What went wrong? If it blew because it was driven hard then it's likely that other supporting components (i.e. Tranny, bushings, brakes, etc) are on their way out as well. However, someone like me who drives their car hard also have proof to show that almost all critical components have been replaced well before recommended service intervals and are likely in better condition than a garage queen 1991 car with 10k miles. So from that sense you be the judge...
 
In the first place I wouldn't be much interested in a blow car but if I was going to make an offer for one I would be less than had the engine been left stock. Not only do I not want the blower I don't want what is left of the engine and drive train after the last owner enjoyed the blower. For instance there is on for sale on E-Bay right now that the guy tells you had a blower but the engine blew and so he replaced it with the naturally aspired engine that is in it now. So what he's telling me is he ran the bejezuz out of the car, blew the engine, stuck another one in and now he'd done with the car - it can become my problem. And the guy is asking money for like it was as a dead stock low-milage garage queen.
 
I got mine for approximately $40k for a '98 with nearly 99k miles but the previous owner just spent around $23k 2k miles prior for a CTSC, SOS strut bar, CT Catbacks, CT headers, timing belt, water pump, alternator, o2 sensors, head cover gasket, taillight gasket, t top and trunk weather strips, etc. He had to let go for additional business funds. Not really sure if the price is right but I am extremely happy which is important.
 
I think you should buy the best Stock car you can afford.
Hang out with other owners, once you have it.
Drive it.
Learn and understand it.
You Will find out, what works for others, may or may not work for you.
Then decide on the mods.
It's a great process.
You will appreciate your car so much more!
 
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