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Verizon 4G LTE users.. can you..

Joined
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Saint Augustine, FL
Browse the web and send email while you are on the phone? I know this wasn't possible on CDMA 3g (except a few models), but does it work on 4G?
 
Yes you can with any LTE phone on Verizon, and some phones can even do it on 3G. I know the Rezound and the GS3 can do it on 3G as well.
 
Yes you can with any LTE phone on Verizon, and some phones can even do it on 3G. I know the Rezound and the GS3 can do it on 3G as well.

Thats what I thought, but the verizon sales rep told me I was wrong.
 
Thats what I thought, but the verizon sales rep told me I was wrong.

Verizon sales rep thought the domestic version of the GS3 has a quad core. Some also thought the difference between the 16 and 32 gig model was that the 32 gig is a 16 gig with an additional 16 gig sd card. I also remember hearing another sales rep saying that the HTC incredible will be able to use LTE when LTE rolls out ( it can't )

I know probably 100X's more info than they do =) Figuratively of course.
 
I can confirm for the Galaxy Nexus and Droid Charge, and to my understanding, most Android phones including the SIII.

However, according to reports, NOT for the iphone 5 if that is why you are asking.

It is an iphone 5 limitation due to antennas/radio, not an LTE or Verizon limitation.
 
Doesn't it seem, from an engineering standpoint, like bad power management to run LTE and CDMA radios simultaneously? (That is how the other LTE phones accomplish it.) It's like working around the CDMA voice/data issue via brute force hardware.

"If it doesn't support voice and data, by golly, we'll turn on both of our radios!"

When the carriers implement Voice over LTE, it will be much better for everyone's battery life.
 
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yes u can. i have galaxy s 3 and it work great.. text, browse, while being on the line.. it's awesome.
 
Doesn't it seem, from an engineering standpoint, like bad power management to run LTE and CDMA radios simultaneously? (That is how the other LTE phones accomplish it.) It's like working around the CDMA voice/data issue via brute force hardware.

"If it doesn't support voice and data, by golly, we'll turn on both of our radios!"

When the carriers implement Voice over LTE, it will be much better for everyone's battery life.

Better that than completely lacking the capability.
 
Doesn't it seem, from an engineering standpoint, like bad power management to run LTE and CDMA radios simultaneously? (That is how the other LTE phones accomplish it.) It's like working around the CDMA voice/data issue via brute force hardware.

"If it doesn't support voice and data, by golly, we'll turn on both of our radios!"

When the carriers implement Voice over LTE, it will be much better for everyone's battery life.

Kind of sounds like an excuse for not having it. The s3 does fine on battery life with it. Yes, voice over Lte might be better, but that no reason not to do it now IMO.

Plus you could always add an option to turn it off.
 
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Kind of sounds like an excuse for not having it. The s3 does fine on battery life with it. Yes, voice over Lte might be better, but that no reason not to do it now IMO.

Plus you could always add an option to turn it off.

I don't mean it is an excuse, but it does indicate it is a tradeoff, something they considered before deciding I'm sure. Perhaps that is a benefit of a big phone--you have the battery so you can afford to do it.

You as the designer can decide to have an option to turn such things off, but the ordinary user won't really understand that he or she has to do that, leading to bad impressions of battery life. Apple's philosophy definitely shies away from those situations, preferring instead to wait until there is a solution that doesn't require the option to turn things off. (Yes, you can turn off 3G in the older iPhones, but at some point they dropped it.)
 
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I don't mean it is an excuse, but it does indicate it is a tradeoff, something they considered before deciding I'm sure. Perhaps that is a benefit of a big phone--you have the battery so you can afford to do it.

You as the designer can decide to have an option to turn such things off, but the ordinary user won't really understand that he or she has to do that, leading to bad impressions of battery life. Apple's philosophy definitely shies away from those situations, preferring instead to wait until there is a solution that doesn't require the option to turn things off. (Yes, you can turn off 3G in the older iPhones, but at some point they dropped it.)

The major tradeoff Apple made was form over function. They could have added the extra antenna to implement this functionality, but they chose not to for thinness. They could have added a larger battery if that was a concern like the Droid Razr Maxx HD, but they didn't. The point is Apple has the capability to implement the functionality and keep battery life or improve it, but they chose not to for looks.

WHY?

Apple knows its user base appreciates form over function. Apple knows that 99%+ of users will never even know that they lack this feature, but 100% can appreciate an ~18% thinner phone (which in itself is nominal considering we are talking about micrometers at this point).

This isn't necessarily bad. It is just Apple. Make things pretty, and they will sell. Don't change a proven formula. That's why we haven't seen a radical departure from the first iphone. Why would they change a thing when this has made them the largest company in the world by market cap (over exxon mobile).
 
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The major tradeoff Apple made was form over function. They could have added the extra antenna to implement this functionality, but they chose not to for thinness. They could have added a larger battery if that was a concern like the Droid Razr Maxx HD, but they didn't. The point is Apple has the capability to implement the functionality and keep battery life or improve it, but they chose not to for looks.

WHY?

Apple knows its user base appreciates form over function. Apple knows that 99%+ of users will never even know that they lack this feature, but 100% can appreciate an ~18% thinner phone (which in itself is nominal considering we are talking about micrometers at this point).

This isn't necessarily bad. It is just Apple. Make things pretty, and they will sell. Don't change a proven formula. That's why we haven't seen a radical departure from the first iphone. Why would they change a thing when this has made them the largest company in the world by market cap (over exxon mobile).

I agree with pretty much all you are saying. Let me just disagree with your characterization in one small detail.

Sure, it is Apple and they make pretty things, but you are leaving out the user experience part. It is significant to long term user satisfaction that the phone will feel to the customer to have long battery life out of the box, without any tweaking of settings. This means 100% of customers get the longer battery life, even the tech illiterate ones, rather than only the savvy people who read tech forums and know to turn off 4G when they don't need it. The percentage of users who will really dislike the lack of concurrent radios is likely much smaller than the percentage of users (almost 100%) who will really like longer battery life (along with the shiny and light and thin part), Apple is betting. This is anti-geek, but this kind of thinking is what leads to the high customer satisfaction ratings. People will not be repeat customers if the product was actually only shiny but they end up having a bad experience over the one or two years they use the thing.
 
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I agree with pretty much all you are saying. Let me just disagree with your characterization in one small detail.

Sure, it is Apple and they make pretty things, but you are leaving out the user experience part. It is significant to long term user satisfaction that the phone will feel to the customer to have long battery life out of the box, without any tweaking of settings. This means 100% of customers get the longer battery life, even the tech illiterate ones, rather than only the savvy people who read tech forums and know to turn off 4G when they don't need it. The percentage of users who will really dislike the lack of concurrent radios is likely much smaller than the percentage of users (almost 100%) who will really like longer battery life (along with the shiny and light and thin part), Apple is betting. This is anti-geek, but this kind of thinking is what leads to the high customer satisfaction ratings. People will not be repeat customers if the product was actually only shiny but they end up having a bad experience over the one or two years they use the thing.


I agree with you overall, but again, they can add a larger battery or address battery life by other means (for example, by increasing the wifi scan time by 200 ms)

The main reason is still looks/thinness--not battery life or UI (unless you count thinness as part of UI).

But as what I said before is completely congruous with what you said: only a small percentage of people will even know about these problems while the majority will see a shiny new iphone and buy regardless (as they have demonstrated again by selling out in less than 1 hour).

The Razr Maxx HD will prove that you can have all of the above (32 hr 3300 mah battery), thin design (although not sure if it is thinner than the iphone), simultaneous data/voice, LTE, HD screen (even larger than iphone), etc. Hopefully they ditched the pentile display.

The only arguable "downside" being that it isn't an iphone, although I have to say that the carbon fiber backplate and new design (which mimics the iphone 4/4s) is starting to look really good to me.
 
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The major tradeoff Apple made was form over function. They could have added the extra antenna to implement this functionality, but they chose not to for thinness. They could have added a larger battery if that was a concern like the Droid Razr Maxx HD, but they didn't. The point is Apple has the capability to implement the functionality and keep battery life or improve it, but they chose not to for looks.

WHY?

So that when the iPhone 5S comes out they can tout it as a great new feature that they invented.
 
I agree with you overall, but again, they can add a larger battery or address battery life by other means (for example, by increasing the wifi scan time by 200 ms)

The main reason is still looks/thinness--not battery life or UI (unless you count thinness as part of UI).

But as what I said before is completely congruous with what you said: only a small percentage of people will even know about these problems while the majority will see a shiny new iphone and buy regardless (as they have demonstrated again by selling out in less than 1 hour).

The Razr Maxx HD will prove that you can have all of the above (32 hr 3300 mah battery), thin design (although not sure if it is thinner than the iphone), simultaneous data/voice, LTE, HD screen (even larger than iphone), etc. Hopefully they ditched the pentile display.

The only arguable "downside" being that it isn't an iphone, although I have to say that the carbon fiber backplate and new design (which mimics the iphone 4/4s) is starting to look really good to me.

I hear what you're saying. I guess that's why the competition is good, so we can have these different design trade offs. I've always been a Motorola fan, from back when I had one of those tiny vader phones on Verizon. The hardware was excellent, but the UI was designed by Unix geeks.
 
So that when the iPhone 5S comes out they can tout it as a great new feature that they invented.

lol. true.

I hear what you're saying. I guess that's why the competition is good, so we can have these different design trade offs. I've always been a Motorola fan, from back when I had one of those tiny vader phones on Verizon. The hardware was excellent, but the UI was designed by Unix geeks.

yeah, definitely.

I owned a Droid X, Droid X2, and my sister has a Droid 2. I HATE the motorola Blur skin (their software and/or firmware). One benefit of Motorola though is that their radios are absolutely amazing, which, perhaps with other hardware, makes their sound quality so damn good. When I got my Droid X, my gf at the time couldn't believe how clear I sounded (I came from an ATT 3GS). Never got that again, even with my Samsung Galaxy Nexus.

Anyways, I hope my iphone ships by the 21st. I have a 28th date currently through Verizon. Arggg, why did I wait? I waited until midnight to preorder, but ran into some trouble keeping my unlimited plan. By the time my order went through (12:50AM PST), my email said 2 weeks, which slipped to oct. 4th. Now I hear some of those dates were bumped up to Sept 21.

Back on topic:

without simultaneous voice/data, i can see some problems for people that will tether a lot or use navigation a lot. I am not sure how Apple's nav system will work, so it may be fine if it prefetches all the map tiles. But I am sure they have put a priority on voice, so that will interrupt your data transmission.
 
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