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any one know jet skis?

Joined
8 July 2003
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Hole
thinking of picking up one or two. likely used via craigslist.

don't know anything about them.

need direction. I want the sit down kind.
 
I used to own pair of seadoo XPs before. Make sure get the ones with low hours and been well maintained. When I was in Michigan I have to take it to the shop every year (winter & spring service). Also, the wheel bearings for the trailer failed on me so you might want to check on that too.

Good luck!

thinking of picking up one or two. likely used via craigslist.

don't know anything about them.

need direction. I want the sit down kind.
 
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Get a Kawasaki 250x you will love it!!!! Buy as new as you can afford or you will regret it. I have had tons of skis and they all break quite often. If you get seadoos with the SC make sure the washer upgrade has been done. Get the right safety equipment. Do not buy skis that you can not test on the water before you purchase them. Have a PPI done it will pay for itself 10X over. Don't buy skis that have a rattle in the drive.

Try and frown when you are riding, it's impossible. It's the closest thing to being on a magic carpet.

Buy two and I will fly to your place and ride. :biggrin:
 
Had Sea Doos at the other cottage, frequently in the shop. Now have 2Yamahas since 2000 (GTR and XL1200). No problems. No visits to the shop. Winterization consists of flushing the engine and running Stabil through the tank through the carbs and removing the batteries. Spring, put in the batteries and start them up. Change the spark plugs every 2 years and lube every 2 years.

Strongly recommend going with Yamahas. Would also consider HONDA since we all love HONDA :biggrin: In regards to power, whatever you want since our GTR does 65 mph and the XL1200 does 55 mph.
 
I trashed 2 yamahas in less than a year GP1200's.

The Hondas are bullet proof but they are SSSLLLLOOOOWWWWW.
 
I just bought one, Sea-Doo RXT-X Best ski out, has won all the contests too. Also it comes with the updated washers and the X package rocks, the spedo registers only to 70 and I can keep it at 70 all day long ;) I paid 14k out the door.
 
I just bought one, Sea-Doo RXT-X Best ski out, has won all the contests too. Also it comes with the updated washers and the X package rocks, the spedo registers only to 70 and I can keep it at 70 all day long ;) I paid 14k out the door.

although the speedo says 70 i bet top end is closer to 80 if not 85.
 
although the speedo says 70 i bet top end is closer to 80 if not 85.

I was out again today, it's like crack and the better I understand the machine the more I like it :) I will say that this has been as much or more fun then a track day in a car. The best part is you do not have any rules, just hall ass and dont die.
 
jeez all you ballers here. I'm hoping to buy a pair used including the towing rig for $5k.

I talked to several of the jet skiers at the lake yesterday and every one of them had picked up a used one dirt cheaep and were very happy.
 
I had a 12 year old 2 stroke ski that I bought new, It was just time to upgrade. I still got 1500 for that ski too :) It's a lot of fun but don't for get about gas. That will cost 50-100 a day depending how much you ride it.
 
The 2-strokes are typically lighter and more fun. I have a couple 2000 Sea-Doos, an XP 2-seater (carbureted 951cc 2-stroke) and a GTX DI 3-seater (fuel injected 951cc 2-stroke). I'm starting to hate the DI because the fuel injection can be problematic. The carbed engines are simple, reliable and easy and cheap to modify for greater performance.

I wouldn't trade my XP for any of the new 4-strokes. It's hundreds of pounds lighter, more fun to jump waves or carve turns with, and simpler to maintain. It does 65 mph, which isn't noticeably slower than a 75 mph brand new one. But it's 1/3 the cost.
 
Buy new and sell them at the end of the season cheap and get new ones every year......less headaches and more fun

Depending on where you live, how soon you want to start enjoying it, and whether you plan to keep if for a while, from an economic standpoint, it's better to buy at the end of the riding season in the winter. By then, people have stopped using them and the prices become much cheaper. If you buy now, you'll pay a premium because the riding season is in full swing.

I like to buy a better replacement ski in the winter when it's cheap and sell the one it's replacing the following spring when the prices come back up. This way you minimize the upgrade cost. Also, the lower hour units tend to be up north where the riding season is very short, so I have driven as far as Long Island to bring back a ski to Florida. Now if you live in the south and plan to buy locally, this isn't as much of an advantage as we can typically ride 10 months out of the year.

Of course, if you want to start enjoying them away, then you just have to look for the best deal and bite the bullet now.

They ARE fun though!
 
thinking of picking up one or two. likely used via craigslist.

don't know anything about them.

need direction. I want the sit down kind.
PWCs
They are like motorcycles/dirt bikes. I had a used Bombardier XP and a new Yamaha Waverunner LX. When I lived on the water, I rode them in saltwater, jumping waves on a regular basis and broke stuff constantly.
But they were a BLAST!!!
 
The 2-strokes are typically lighter and more fun. I have a couple 2000 Sea-Doos, an XP 2-seater (carbureted 951cc 2-stroke) and a GTX DI 3-seater (fuel injected 951cc 2-stroke). I'm starting to hate the DI because the fuel injection can be problematic. The carbed engines are simple, reliable and easy and cheap to modify for greater performance.

I wouldn't trade my XP for any of the new 4-strokes. It's hundreds of pounds lighter, more fun to jump waves or carve turns with, and simpler to maintain. It does 65 mph, which isn't noticeably slower than a 75 mph brand new one. But it's 1/3 the cost.


I have been on 3 different ski's now and I like the heavier ones better due to running in chop. Everyone wants a light fast ski until they go 60 hit chop and fly off. Also the 2 strokes are a pain in the ass, trying to tune carbs and also no one works on them anymore. I guess if you like to fix your own stuff it's fine but to me going to the lake and having to bring my stuff is already a pain in the ass and the easier I can make using the lake the better. Also it's not very fun to get stuck on the lake due to having a old ski of finding parts for something like a 2 stroke.
 
Depending on where you live, how soon you want to start enjoying it, and whether you plan to keep if for a while, from an economic standpoint, it's better to buy at the end of the riding season in the winter. By then, people have stopped using them and the prices become much cheaper. If you buy now, you'll pay a premium because the riding season is in full swing.

I like to buy a better replacement ski in the winter when it's cheap and sell the one it's replacing the following spring when the prices come back up. This way you minimize the upgrade cost. Also, the lower hour units tend to be up north where the riding season is very short, so I have driven as far as Long Island to bring back a ski to Florida. Now if you live in the south and plan to buy locally, this isn't as much of an advantage as we can typically ride 10 months out of the year.

Of course, if you want to start enjoying them away, then you just have to look for the best deal and bite the bullet now.

They ARE fun though!

I just did not want to buy other peoples problems... I agree you will take a hit buying new and selling at the end of the season but for me having no place to store it for the winter it was cheaper to sell then to pay for storage and such and such.
 
I just did not want to buy other peoples problems... I agree you will take a hit buying new and selling at the end of the season but for me having no place to store it for the winter it was cheaper to sell then to pay for storage and such and such.

I agree with your perspective 100% as one of the first skis I bought turned out to be someone else's hidden problem that became my own. Now that I've rebuilt the engine on that one and done other maintenance stuff on my others, I'm more comfortable when looking at a prospective purchase, knowing what it might need in the future and whether I want to do the work myself to save some money.

But everyone should analyze their own situation before they make a buying decision.
 
I just did not want to buy other peoples problems... I agree you will take a hit buying new and selling at the end of the season but for me having no place to store it for the winter it was cheaper to sell then to pay for storage and such and such.


This is probably about the best way to do buy a jet ski or snowmobile.
 
had 4 sea-doo jet ski from 91-2003 sp,xp, rx and hx had few problems.
98 sea-doo jet boat 1800 no problems friends had yamaha's no problems.
have two yamaha sleds 5K on one 3k on the other run like new. Sea-doo
more maint, just my 02c.

Brian
 
If you get them and roll them, roll them over the right way,or water will get in the engine via the exhaust pipe.
 
jeez not much of a consensus here... everyone has ridden everything.

How about some specific answers..

1:what should I avoid (i understand I don't want one with 300hours on the clock).. i mean should I avoid models without cruise control, or models with less than xyz HP or models with more than X hours etc.

2:I want a 2-3 seater. Any model better than others?

3: are there specific models within specific manufacturers to avoid or go after? I don't want a 2 stroke or carbed.

I'm going to sit on this urge till prob. september... on phoenix.craigslist.com right now there are quite a few listed. I'm sure as the economy takes a dump and it cools down weatherwise, i'll have an even better selection.

4: i'm planning on keeping these suckers for years. plenty of storage space.
gerry
 
jeez not much of a consensus here... everyone has ridden everything.

How about some specific answers..

1:what should I avoid (i understand I don't want one with 300hours on the clock).. i mean should I avoid models without cruise control, or models with less than xyz HP or models with more than X hours etc.

2:I want a 2-3 seater. Any model better than others?

3: are there specific models within specific manufacturers to avoid or go after? I don't want a 2 stroke or carbed.

I'm going to sit on this urge till prob. september... on phoenix.craigslist.com right now there are quite a few listed. I'm sure as the economy takes a dump and it cools down weatherwise, i'll have an even better selection.

4: i'm planning on keeping these suckers for years. plenty of storage space.
gerry

If you don't need to go wicked fast just get the Honda. Check at the dealer first as Honda dealers ended up with lots of left over inventory because of a conflict with dealers who were selling other brands. Last time I was at the Honda dealer they had 05 brand new leftovers for 1/2 what they cost new.
 
hey guys... looking on craig's slit, there's a lot of jetski's advertised. how do i know which ones are two stroke vs. 4? is there some list somewhere i can access?

thanks.
 
hey guys... looking on craig's slit, there's a lot of jetski's advertised. how do i know which ones are two stroke vs. 4? is there some list somewhere i can access?

thanks.


Just have to know it, I myself would do a 4 stroke for the water just due to it having more problems and most places around here will not work on them anymore and at $110 a hour it's not worth having a problem one.
 
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