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Missing Zanardi?

Joined
27 November 2005
Messages
6,030
Location
SoCal ✈ Vegas
These are pictures of a Honda promo car that was crushed a few years back, before it was crushed, some misc parts were removed by a shop, and I purchased the rear bumper a few months ago.

When I picked up my rear bumper, I noticed he was selling some interior items from the same car, which had red stitching (e-brake handle); he also had a shift boot with the 6spd emblem. Interested, I asked him some questions about the car, and was told it was a 1999 all-red 3.2L coupe.

Recently, I came across some pictures of the car:

General058.jpg


General062.jpg


General064.jpg


According to the shop, the car did not have a VIN plate, and was crushed by Honda as a write-off.
 
Honda does crush a fair amount of cars!
 
How did you get those pics,and why would a"shop" be able to part out a sacrificial factory car?
 
How did you get those pics,and why would a"shop" be able to part out a sacrificial factory car?

The pics are from another website where the seller is advertising some parts, I know it is the same car, as he had the wheels available; most of the parts are gone, I think he had a hood, some interior items, and some glass when I was there.

To answer the second part of your question, I don't know if this was an 'authorized' parting, he did mention that he only took certain panels, and could not get them all, or critical components (eg engine/transmission). I mentioned my sighting to some local owners when I picked up the rear bumper, but did not have pics of the car until I came across these.
 
The pics are from another website where the seller is advertising some parts, I know it is the same car, as he had the wheels available; most of the parts are gone, I think he had a hood, some interior items, and some glass when I was there.

Link? Curious to see more information on this car.
 
It has always saddened me to think how many wonderful Honda cars, and NSXs, were crushed at the end of their time with Honda. I remember a District Service Rep telling me that he was once at the site to witness them crushing a bunch of cars. He said there was either a half dozen or a full dozen NSXs there. All with low VINs. He said he almost cried. So did I just hearing the story. Why they did not sell them 'as-is' I just do not understand. :frown:

I narrowly missed an opportunity to buy the 1993 Brooklands Green NSX from Comptech, but somone else got ahead of me in line with a deposit before I could lock in the purchase. I wonder where that proud car is now? :(
 
It has always saddened me to think how many wonderful Honda cars, and NSXs, were crushed at the end of their time with Honda. I remember a District Service Rep telling me that he was once at the site to witness them crushing a bunch of cars. He said there was either a half dozen or a full dozen NSXs there. All with low VINs. He said he almost cried. So did I just hearing the story. Why they did not sell them 'as-is' I just do not understand. :frown:(

I didn't understand that, sorry, seems to be my language barrier. WHO crushes the cars apart? It seems they get more money of it selling the parts than selling the hole car.
 
WHO crushes the cars apart? It seems they get more money of it selling the parts than selling the hole car.

The process is done for tax reasons; by crushing the car, Honda can write off the full production cost for the vehicle, as an 'advertising' or other expense, rather than waste time and resources trying to part it out (they're not in the used part business), or receive a lesser amount by auctioning it off. They could not sell the car, as it does not have a VIN, and has not been brought into the country as a production vehicle.

By this logic, nobody should be removing parts from the car prior to its crushing, although as an interesting note, a silver nsx-t with the exact same history has been parted over the last few months on YJ auctions, with no accident damage and low mileage; perhaps the rules are different in Japan for dealing with these cars.
 
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