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Any Crossfitters here?

Joined
19 April 2009
Messages
670
Location
Mid Atlantic Area
Yep, I drank the kool aid and now am a firm believe in the program. I've been doing it for about 4 months now and finally started to gain some muscle weight (went from 152lbs to 160lbs)

For those unfamiliar with Crossfit, check out the games! http://games.crossfit.com/article/espn2-tv-schedule

Prior to that, I spent about 6 months doing regular weight lifting that did nothing for me.

I freaking love it, even though my entire body hurts like heck right now.

I'm hoping to continue when I get home, but I hear there are no Crossfit boxes near where I live. booo.

Any body else?
 
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So are you going to a class to do it, or are you doing it at home.
It does seem interesting. Looks pretty intense.
 
Funny you say drink the Kool-Aid, my friends that do it are obsessed. I prefer my own workout. That said there are some dangers to cross-fit depending on your level of health and experience.

http://www.menshealth.com/fitness/cult-crossfit

I would think over training would be a serious big issue, guess that depends on how often and how long you do it.

Good luck, key thing to me with excercise, is finding something you really really like...or you just won't stick to it.
 
I've been thinking about it, but it's pretty damned expensive (the one by my house I believe is around $180/month). My friend is a fanatic about it (and now so is his wife and a couple of other guys he pulled in). I do have to say in the past year he has gone from flabby to simply HUGE and non-flabby. He does it 4-5 days a week. All the people I refer to are in their early 40s. I'm a little intimidated though after hearing stories about newbies being pushed until they puke. I'm not big on working out until I puke and I felt close a few times at BJJ and it didn't take this out of shape guy long to get there!
 
So are you going to a class to do it, or are you doing it at home.
It does seem interesting. Looks pretty intense.

I'm deployed right now, and there are certified instructors that coach anyone interested at the gym on base. I've learned the movements pretty well. The coach is a stickler on form and I'm happy for that. This way I can continue on my own if I can't find a box.

I've been on the fence, there are 2 by my house. Whats the cost? How is the nutrition advice?

Free for now. Nutrition advice, not much. He makes recommendations for Progenics protein mix and basic suggestions on how to eat. The way we train, lots of protein and fats are necessary. But I'm not paying for anything so I couldn't tell you how the boxes out there do. I just eat clean all the time and pack in more proteins, fats, and carbs. -- I've gained a few lbs of muscle, but it is lean and strong.

I've watched some skinny dudes get buff in a couple of months of dedicated CF here. that's 4-5 days a week for 2 months.

Funny you say drink the Kool-Aid, my friends that do it are obsessed. I prefer my own workout. That said there are some dangers to cross-fit depending on your level of health and experience.

http://www.menshealth.com/fitness/cult-crossfit

I would think over training would be a serious big issue, guess that depends on how often and how long you do it.

Good luck, key thing to me with excercise, is finding something you really really like...or you just won't stick to it.

You're right, it is very high intensity. If you have preexisting heart conditions, you either try to take it easy or don't do it at all. Taking it easy kind of defeats the purpose. Our coach once told us that overtraining is not really an issue for athletes at our level. The biggest one is under recovery. That's why he mandates 2 "active rest days" and 5 Workout days. Active rest = stretching, muscle rolling, or yoga of some kind.

The idea behind those timed workouts is Metabolic conditioning.. basically pushing your muscles to the limit quickly and continuing at that level.

I've been thinking about it, but it's pretty damned expensive (the one by my house I believe is around $180/month). My friend is a fanatic about it (and now so is his wife and a couple of other guys he pulled in). I do have to say in the past year he has gone from flabby to simply HUGE and non-flabby. He does it 4-5 days a week. All the people I refer to are in their early 40s. I'm a little intimidated though after hearing stories about newbies being pushed until they puke. I'm not big on working out until I puke and I felt close a few times at BJJ and it didn't take this out of shape guy long to get there!

I have heard it gets pretty pricey, but I think it would be totally worth it. The community of crossfitters is awesome. Yes, some will push to the point of puking. But no worries, it's considered 'resting' so that you may continue through the work out. haha. If you're a serious BJJ guy, I highly recommend crossfit as the program is geared towards strengthening your core and natural movements. We do a lot of kettlebell swings that strengthen the core and hips -- which I hear is pretty crucial for BJJ. Excellent conditioning program for any sport, if you ask me.
 
You're right, it is very high intensity. If you have preexisting heart conditions, you either try to take it easy or don't do it at all. Taking it easy kind of defeats the purpose. Our coach once told us that overtraining is not really an issue for athletes at our level. The biggest one is under recovery. That's why he mandates 2 "active rest days" and 5 Workout days. Active rest = stretching, muscle rolling, or yoga of some kind.

This stuck with me:

Rhabdomyolysis is another health concern that's become associated with CrossFit over the years. "Rhabdo" can occur when muscles are worked so hard that the fibers break down, releasing the protein myoglobin into the bloodstream. In extreme cases, it can lead to kidney damage or even kidney failure. It's commonly seen in people with crush injuries, such as those from auto accidents.


I even talked to a friend of mine who is a doctor and he knew about this. It happened to a college football team, so not just people out of shape.

http://content.usatoday.com/communi...1/01/iowa-13-football-players-rhabdomyolsis/1
 
This stuck with me:

Rhabdomyolysis is another health concern that's become associated with CrossFit over the years. "Rhabdo" can occur when muscles are worked so hard that the fibers break down, releasing the protein myoglobin into the bloodstream. In extreme cases, it can lead to kidney damage or even kidney failure. It's commonly seen in people with crush injuries, such as those from auto accidents.


I even talked to a friend of mine who is a doctor and he knew about this. It happened to a college football team, so not just people out of shape.

http://content.usatoday.com/communi...1/01/iowa-13-football-players-rhabdomyolsis/1

That is interesting. Like I said, inadequate rest and recovery will lead to that, regardless of how fit you are. If you watch the Crossfit games, those athletes are the few this condition would not affect. The amount of training needed for that level of performance is just insane
 
Is it just me or does it seem like this sort of workout would be risky for your lower back? Lifting weights above your head to the point of exhaustion seems like a great way to compress some discs.

I actually used to work out with one of the guys who competes at the games and is featured in some of the YOTD videos when we were both teenagers. I'd love to give it a try sometime, but I already have two bulging discs in my lower back.
 
This stuck with me:

Rhabdomyolysis is another health concern that's become associated with CrossFit over the years. "Rhabdo" can occur when muscles are worked so hard that the fibers break down, releasing the protein myoglobin into the bloodstream. In extreme cases, it can lead to kidney damage or even kidney failure. It's commonly seen in people with crush injuries, such as those from auto accidents.


I even talked to a friend of mine who is a doctor and he knew about this. It happened to a college football team, so not just people out of shape.

http://content.usatoday.com/communi...1/01/iowa-13-football-players-rhabdomyolsis/1

this happened to a friend of mine- Smoke jumper, avid cross-fitter, runner ect- they caught it in time and he is fine, but it was a reality check for sure.

I do cross-fit workouts as part of my regimen, but I don't attend classes on the regular, and i've never joined a "box". Several trainers are friends of mine from my BJJ, Tough Mudder, and GORUCK exploits so I just meet up with them for workouts.
 
I started Crossfit on Monday, and so far it's been pretty crazy. Got a Groupon/Amazon Local deal for a local gym here and decided to try it out for a month.
It's good, but I do see how you can injure or overexert yourself pretty easily.

I mean, I haven't worked out in 7+ months and I jumped into the "Fundamentals" course which is 1 week. Everyday so far has been the most intense workout I've ever done, so I can see the benefits of how it'll get you in shape real quick.

What worries me is that even though I put on my waiver that I had ankle and shoulder issues, I was never asked about it and my coaches never modified the workout for me unless I brought it to their attention. I had to specifically say, "I don't think I can do that with my shoulder injury". They would then modify the workout.

If you're one of those quiet people that don't speak up and try to push through it, it's really easy to overdo it and bite off more than you can chew.

If you're in pretty decent shape already and know how to workout, I think it's a great way to change it up.

The other think I just found out about it is that CrossFit is actually a trademarked name. It's founded by Greg Glassman and all the gyms are "affilliates" that pay to use the "CrossFit" name. Lots of good info in the Wikipedia article:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CrossFit
 
I used to think personal trainers were nonsense, but I have to admit that I saw the biggest results when I used one. Even after I stopped personal training, when I redid the programs myself precisely, I didn't gain/lose as much.

I think it's the fact that they push you beyond your comfort zone, whereas you usually stop or slow yourself down.
 
I used to think personal trainers were nonsense, but I have to admit that I saw the biggest results when I used one. Even after I stopped personal training, when I redid the programs myself precisely, I didn't gain/lose as much.

I think it's the fact that they push you beyond your comfort zone, whereas you usually stop or slow yourself down.

Being a personal trainer by trade, I can agree with you to an extent. Many personal trainers are nonsense. Some of us aren't. It is more than "pushing beyond comfort zone", though that is part of it. My clients pay me for all the education I've purchased (Exercise science degree, certifications,etc.), my many hours of post collegiate research over the last decade and my time.

For those of us worth a damn in the fitness industry we do more than count reps and hold a clip board :biggrin: Believe it or not it is difficult to design a training program for individuals based on their strengths and limitations, physical or psychological. A good trainer/strength coach knows how to properly periodize their client's training and adequately modulate their intensities and load progressions, not only on a week-to-week basis but, in my opinion, more importantly, on a set-to-set basis. For a trainer to learn these things takes time and effort (years). Other considerations I have to deal with are specific contraindications to movements based on the past injuries, present injuries and physical imbalances. I spend a tremendous amount of my time with my clients working with them to correct physical imbalances. Who knew sitting at a desk 40-60 hours a week would cost so much to reverse!!! I won't even go into how I have to manage not only my client's bodies but their emotions as well.

Part of the purpose being a trainer is to place my clients in a position to no longer need me. Unfortunately, they've taken a liking to me and insist on keeping me on their payroll, for years on end. Some days I feel like an overpaid babysitter, other days I feel like an underpaid therapist. I suppose that means I should raise my rates to be more in line with a therapist??
 
Is it just me or does it seem like this sort of workout would be risky for your lower back? Lifting weights above your head to the point of exhaustion seems like a great way to compress some discs.

I actually used to work out with one of the guys who competes at the games and is featured in some of the YOTD videos when we were both teenagers. I'd love to give it a try sometime, but I already have two bulging discs in my lower back.

The purpose of a coach is to ensure your form is correct so that you can mitigate these injuries. If it is bad enough to start causing serious physical pain, you scale it (drop weight) so that you can maximize the workout and finish. I've bruised my spine a couple of times doing some olympic lifts improperly... and attempting more weight than I can manage. The second time was not as bad, since I dropped the weight sooner than the first... Just gotta be careful and practice good form.

this happened to a friend of mine- Smoke jumper, avid cross-fitter, runner ect- they caught it in time and he is fine, but it was a reality check for sure.

I do cross-fit workouts as part of my regimen, but I don't attend classes on the regular, and i've never joined a "box". Several trainers are friends of mine from my BJJ, Tough Mudder, and GORUCK exploits so I just meet up with them for workouts.

If anything, it serves as a fantastic supplement. You don't need a box/coaches if you have guys to do the WODs with and you are familiar with the movements. If i don't find a box, I'm just gonna find some other people who do it and just get with them at the local gym. I will, however, buy some of my own stuff (olympic rings, etc) that traditional gyms don't usually have.

I started Crossfit on Monday, and so far it's been pretty crazy. Got a Groupon/Amazon Local deal for a local gym here and decided to try it out for a month.
It's good, but I do see how you can injure or overexert yourself pretty easily.

What worries me is that even though I put on my waiver that I had ankle and shoulder issues, I was never asked about it and my coaches never modified the workout for me unless I brought it to their attention. I had to specifically say, "I don't think I can do that with my shoulder injury". They would then modify the workout.

If you're one of those quiet people that don't speak up and try to push through it, it's really easy to overdo it and bite off more than you can chew.

If you're in pretty decent shape already and know how to workout, I think it's a great way to change it up.

The other think I just found out about it is that CrossFit is actually a trademarked name. It's founded by Greg Glassman and all the gyms are "affilliates" that pay to use the "CrossFit" name. Lots of good info in the Wikipedia article:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CrossFit

That is a good point. Usually, the number of people in a crossfit group can be pretty big. I don't think the coaches are aware of each person's issues. Def something that needs to be brought up. Our coach is pretty good with this as he can spot if you're struggling and make you stop. If you're injured somewhere, he always has an alternate exercise to let you still get it in without affecting that area.

I used to think personal trainers were nonsense, but I have to admit that I saw the biggest results when I used one. Even after I stopped personal training, when I redid the programs myself precisely, I didn't gain/lose as much.

I think it's the fact that they push you beyond your comfort zone, whereas you usually stop or slow yourself down.




This is true as well. I've also found that doing the workouts with a group of people to compete against or cheer on tends to help as well. coaches and fellow crossfitters are awesome at pushing you and cheering you on when doing the workouts. It's pretty rewarding when you're swimming in your own sweat while you lay there trying to recover. Getting a smoking time is fantastic, too.
 
rhabdomyolisis is a serious condition,it does happen,esp in young healthy people who over exert themselves.In my experience I have seen the most cases in people taking the firemans test, so don't excede your limits.
 
Whats BBJ? I went to both gyms and the muy thai gym seemed to offer more and have slightly more equipment. I always see the crossfit guys outside doing stuff. They muy thai gym has boxing and trx, etc. i really want to combine MMA style training with bikrham yoga.

http://www.austinmuaythai.com/
 
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Whats BBJ? I went to both gyms and the muy thai gym seemed to offer more and have slightly more equipment. I always see the crossfit guys outside doing stuff. They muy thai gym has boxing and trx, etc. i really want to combine MMA style training with bikrham yoga.

http://www.austinmuaythai.com/

BJJ is Brazilian Jiu jitsu . Grappling.

Guys doing Crossfit outside just might the real estate.. You never know. There are a lot of different exercises and workouts to be done, in 4 months, we haven't even begun to scratch the surface. While the movements are similar, Ono two workouts are ever the same. Strength training days are gonna be the same with different expectations... Stuff like that.

H-carWizKid, I don't know how you could become bored with cf. Either you haven't drank the kool aid, or your programming is not effective
 
BJJ is Brazilian Jiu jitsu . Grappling.

H-carWizKid, I don't know how you could become bored with cf. Either you haven't drank the kool aid, or your programming is not effective

It's funny- I really have to mix it up or I become complacent. I like to run, but I could never just be a runner, I enjoy BJJ, but even that needs to be supplemented with another activity- which is how I got into Tough Mudders, and then Tough Mudder got to be a bit stale, so I hit up a Spartan Race. Pretty soon I started falling in with the Crossfit crowd and following WODs I'd get over email, and from Facebook groups. Doing that got me into some new friendships locally, and now I have groups I can meet up at Red Rocks for crossfit, and stair climbing. That got me into GORUCK, and the next thing you know I'm jogging down Colfax at 3am along with 22 other people with a tree trunk on my shoulder (6 of us carrying a telephone pole diameter tree trunk that was about 12 ft long, trading that weight around between 3 groups of 6)

But it isn't one thing, then the next, then the next... OH NO- it's one thing AND the next, AND the next- so here I am training BJJ, and running multiple times a week- sprinkle in some WODs- all to prepare for the next TM, or GORUCK Challenge, or Spartan Race, of Jiu Jitsu tournament...

To think, just 3 years ago I was pretty content to be on my couch playing Call of Duty. Those days are so far gone I can hardly remember what they were like.
 
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It's funny- I really have to mix it up or I become complacent. I like to run, but I could never just be a runner, I enjoy BJJ, but even that needs to be supplemented with another activity- which is how I got into Tough Mudders, and then Tough Mudder got to be a bit stale, so I hit up a Spartan Race. Pretty soon I started falling in with the Crossfit crowd and following WODs I'd get over email, and from Facebook groups. Doing that got me into some new friendships locally, and now I have groups I can meet up at Red Rocks for crossfit, and stair climbing. That got me into GORUCK, and the next thing you know I'm jogging down Colfax at 3am along with 22 other people with a tree trunk on my shoulder (6 of us carrying a telephone pole diameter tree trunk that was about 12 ft long, trading that weight around between 3 groups of 6)

But it isn't one thing, then the next, then the next... OH NO- it's one thing AND the next, AND the next- so here I am training BJJ, and running multiple times a week- sprinkle in some WODs- all to prepare for the next TM, or GORUCK Challenge, or Spartan Race, of Jiu Jitsu tournament...

To think, just 3 years ago I was pretty content to be on my couch playing Call of Duty. Those days are so far gone I can hardly remember what they were like.

Haha. You're one of THOSE guys. Hey, can't hate for variety. I plan to participate in tough murders nd spartan races when this tour ends. Woot!
 
I have been crossfitting since Feb '12. Since I was younger I enjoyed working out, going to the gym, playing sports etc.
But as most gym rat's know, it's easy to get bored doing chest/tri's and back/bi's and legs/core the other days.
Crossfit has been the best thing I have ever done, my wife actually bought me the foundations class for a bday present back in Feb.

I will do my best to explain getting into crossfit below.
During the first month, your trying to fit it to the classes and understand the movement's, you'll feel weak and usually unorgainzed due to the complexity of the olympic movements.
Month 2 you begin to find your way and become part of the community and get and give support from everyone around you.
From month 3 and up you check the WOD's and get upset that you can't go bc your busy with work (but you have to pay the bill's right ?)
I have yet to do the same WOD twice, I benefit from having 2 of the best trainer's as my box owners/coaches. Dennis Marshall and Jenn Hunter-Marshall and I train at Crossfit Garden City

Hope my post made sense to all those non crossfitter's looking to get into the sport.
 
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