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Higher mileage SOS Engine Rebuild

Joined
26 March 2023
Messages
70
Hey guys and gals, question for the masses.

Last year I bought a higher mileage @122,000 (decently documented) 1996 T. As a Honda enthusiast for the last 3 decades, I know the standard procedure of "if you don't know the last timing belt job, do a timing belt job with OEM parts". So I paid for an engine out service, had gobs of new hoses, belts, lma, you name it all done. Car runs pretty good current day.

All that said, I am pretty neurotic about any Honda I have ever owned, I plan on getting an SOS supercharger in a few years (2026). I don't think it's a great idea to put it on a high mileage engine even with all the services I have had done.

I want to be a good steward of the car, after all this is my dream car. Most of what I will update or modify, I would consider OEM plus. Aside from the SC, there will be some volk wheels and my existing coilovers....the rest will be simple clean up (new leather, refinished steering wheel, paint correction, etc). Here is where I have questions for the masses.

I want to get the sos engine rebuild a year before the supercharger, is this a good idea? Is it frowned on by the community to get the rebuild (as in does it hurt the value / credibility of the car)?

I honestly never plan on ever selling this car, it's end game for me. So while the value the car may not seem important because of this reason, I guess I am equating value to good stewardship of the timeless car that is the NSX, so my concern really is "does a rebuild hurt the oem~ness factor of the car of the rest of the car is clearly barely OEM plus"?

Anyway, it's been weighing heavily on me as I take my responsibility of saving the nsx I was lucky enough to get, very seriously.

Thanks for reading my lame probably confusing babble of a post!

Sincerely,

Massive Honda Enthusiast Since 1995
 
If you are planning to install a supercharger, you are making a massive, visible departure from "oem~ness" unless you managed to fit an original dealer supplied comptech supercharger kit with it's rather dodgy fuel management. If you are going to install an SOS supercharger with presumably an aftermarket configurable ECU why quibble with the small details.

Once you put the supercharger on and change the wheels and install coil overs it won't be original and you won't get invited to the Concurs D'elegance. Get over it.
 
Talk to Chris (SOS) about your concerns..
 
If you are planning to install a supercharger, you are making a massive, visible departure from "oem~ness" unless you managed to fit an original dealer supplied comptech supercharger kit with it's rather dodgy fuel management. If you are going to install an SOS supercharger with presumably an aftermarket configurable ECU why quibble with the small details.

Once you put the supercharger on and change the wheels and install coil overs it won't be original and you won't get invited to the Concurs D'elegance. Get over it.
The supercharger is reversible, as are wheels and suspension. I would absolutely consider that as far as an OEM plus build would go. I look at these things a slight modernization of an great older vehicle.

The rebuild is not reversible hence my concern.

Not looking for concourse originality, but knowing at any time I can revert a vehicle to stock is important to the integrity of the car's pedigree (imo) and to me personally, this is why I am struggling with an engine rebuild so much.
 
If you don't plan on selling the car down the road, I say do the engine rebuild and then the supercharger, do what makes you happy. Even if you did the engine rebuild and then decided to sell the car later, I am sure there are people that appreciate that, especially if the job is done by reputable shop like SOS.

I bought mine already modified which is a plus for me, saves me a lot of time and money if I am going to do those mods myself anyway. For instance, my car came with the iLift kit, which is a must for me since I have a steep driveway. If I bought a car that is stock, I have to get coils and the stance cup kit installed even before bringing it home.
 
If you don't plan on selling the car down the road, I say do the engine rebuild and then the supercharger, do what makes you happy. Even if you did the engine rebuild and then decided to sell the car later, I am sure there are people that appreciate that, especially if the job is done by reputable shop like SOS.

I bought mine already modified which is a plus for me, saves me a lot of time and money if I am going to do those mods myself anyway. For instance, my car came with the iLift kit, which is a must for me since I have a steep driveway. If I bought a car that is stock, I have to get coils and the stance cup kit installed even before bringing it home.
Thanks, appreciate the input!
 
It all depends....

If you are doing the rebuild for FI, with lower compression pistons, then the argument you are having with yourself is understandable. This requires bushing the connecting rods and now makes the engine requiring a stand alone ECU a must have. The car must have boost, either supercharged or turbo. So the thoughts of retaining OEM is out the window.

If the rebuild is just to return bearings to OEM tolerances and replace rings and other internals that are out of spec, you are better than new with the current mileage. You could even go this route if you add a supercharger, albeit under mild boost.

SOS is a fabulous vendor for us and does incredible work. They rebuilt my motor to a Stage One to handle reasonable boost levels. The motor is a beast and is very reliable. But only you can determine which way you want to proceed. Everything is a compromise.
 
It all depends....

If you are doing the rebuild for FI, with lower compression pistons, then the argument you are having with yourself is understandable. This requires bushing the connecting rods and now makes the engine requiring a stand alone ECU a must have. The car must have boost, either supercharged or turbo. So the thoughts of retaining OEM is out the window.

If the rebuild is just to return bearings to OEM tolerances and replace rings and other internals that are out of spec, you are better than new with the current mileage. You could even go this route if you add a supercharger, albeit under mild boost.

SOS is a fabulous vendor for us and does incredible work. They rebuilt my motor to a Stage One to handle reasonable boost levels. The motor is a beast and is very reliable. But only you can determine which way you want to proceed. Everything is a compromise.
Awesome, yes the stage one sos is exactly what I want to get done. I visited sos a few months back while in town for business and the whole squad was hella cool, even gave me a tour.

I am just now realizing their stage 1 options are lower compression or OEM....
 
Build it, drive it and enjoy it. At the end of the day I think you just need to ask yourself, am I keeping this or am I trying to sell it down the line and make changes accordingly.
 
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