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O2 Sensors quuestions

Joined
6 June 2004
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1,681
Location
Los Angeles
I have a 92 with 61K miles. The car runs fine and no engine light. Should I change the O2 sensors as a routine maintenace? I figure if I have to change them 10K from now, I might as well do it now.

I read from other posts that I maybe able to save some money on the non OEM sensors. I know Bosch is not good. Are there any others that works as good as the OEM and save some $.

Any comments will be appreciated. :wink:
 
If it isn’t broken don't fix it. Removing the o2's is a bitch and if you strip the threads in the Manifold :eek:

I believe the OEM is a NGK and is available at autoparts stores either with the right length wire and connector or universal fit that you splice into the wires of your old one.
 
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If you were to change the headers on the car, I would definitely change the O2 sensors as well. That being said, if it works, don't fix it. ;) After all the work I spent trying to get the old O2 sensors out of the stock headers, well, I never did get them out; they were just too fused in place. Broke quite a few tools trying to get them out. But the new ones went in nice and easy to the Comptech headers.
 
If you have a DVOM, it is very easy to check the condition of the O2's. The white wire in the 4 pin connector for each O2 is the signal wire. With the engine at normal operating temp and all electrical devices off, the signal should vary continuously from .1 to .9 V taking about 3 seconds to go from one extreme to the other. If one moves very slowly (reffered to as a 'lazy' O2) it is expired. If a heater fails, it will trigger a CEL.

From experience, I would not change them if they work well, but if you have to, most parts stores sell a crowsfoot type O2 (22mm or 7/8") tool that makes it fairly easy but soak them first in a good rust penetrant. Put a tiny amount of anti-sieze on the threads, being carefull not to get any on the sensor. It will be useless if anything contaminates the tip.

MB
 
NSXTech said:
If you have a DVOM, it is very easy to check the condition of the O2's. The white wire in the 4 pin connector for each O2 is the signal wire. With the engine at normal operating temp and all electrical devices off, the signal should vary continuously from .1 to .9 V taking about 3 seconds to go from one extreme to the other. If one moves very slowly (reffered to as a 'lazy' O2) it is expired. If a heater fails, it will trigger a CEL.

From experience, I would not change them if they work well, but if you have to, most parts stores sell a crowsfoot type O2 (22mm or 7/8") tool that makes it fairly easy but soak them first in a good rust penetrant. Put a tiny amount of anti-sieze on the threads, being carefull not to get any on the sensor. It will be useless if anything contaminates the tip.

MB

Should I just wait for the engine light before I change them? Is the engine warning light dependable for the sensors on the NSX?

I heard that some cars' warning systems are not so reliable that the sensors have to be real bad before it warns.

Thanks. :smile:
 
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