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Turbo with stock clutch?

Joined
12 October 2011
Messages
167
Location
Denver, Co
Have read some different reviews stating that people have been running the stock clutch with their FI system. Is there a HP to stay under if going to use the stock clutch?
 
Stay under 380 whp or 300 ftbl torque, still running same stock clutch after more then 2 years But I don't abuse my car like hard launch or doing burn out
 
I think a lot of it has to do with the condition of your clutch going in. My car has 51K on it now w/ its original clutch. Its had about 3-4K miles put on it with my BBSC and it has its good days and bad days. But it also would slip a little from time to time even before FI. Its currently getting an RPS installed. I also should mention the BBSC's power comes on much more linear than a turbo would so its a bit easier on the stock clutch.
 
It would help by bypassing the clutch damper.


I think a lot of it has to do with the condition of your clutch going in. My car has 51K on it now w/ its original clutch. Its had about 3-4K miles put on it with my BBSC and it has its good days and bad days. But it also would slip a little from time to time even before FI. Its currently getting an RPS installed. I also should mention the BBSC's power comes on much more linear than a turbo would so its a bit easier on the stock clutch.
 
I have to say, sometimes it's hard to know if your clutch is slipping or not. With my BBSC, I had no that it was slipping. Swapped to turbo, still didn't know but kind of suspected it. Swapped the clutch, took it out for a spin to test, and holy moly, all this new found tire shredding power. :eek:
 
For casual driving the stock clutch will be fine up to 350ft lbs. in my experience. It will probably even hold up to 400hp on a mild turbo. However, as soon as I started enjoying the car and driving more "spiritedly" it went with a quickness.

The clutch selection for the NSX is slim. It's even worse for you 6spd guys. Someone locally had a bad experience with his SOS Sport clutch after 5k miles of easy driving so maybe it was a manufacturing fluke.. I don't know. The RPS (renamed the SOS twin billet) dual disk was awesome but the price is not so awesome either. I had a friend glaze that over too due product, install, or driver malfunction? I don't know. The Comptech clutches and the RPS clutches are way too stiff!! All this was enough for me to open my eyes and look around.

I'm in the process of installing a Clutch Masters Stage 3 (they call it FX300). It's suppose to hold >550ft lbs. I know someone locally who is currently using the FX200 on his NA NSX. The pedal pressure was slightly softer than stock (is super important for me) and the clutch engagement was very crisp. I basically thought very highly of it.

The flywheel it comes with is Alum and it's 11lbs. Not as light as the Tilton (7lbs) or June (9lbs) but still lighter than stock (15lbs). It has a full segmented kevlar face. The FX200 has a full kevlar face. Kevlar last a very long time but they heat up quicker so they don't use it for serious road racing.

If I was still NA i'd do the FX200 in a heartbeat. I'll have to see how the FX300 does on my car. I'm cautiously optimistic because a clutch with soft pedal pressure, high clamping force, and relatively inexpensive might be all too good to be true.

The FX300 System uses the Power Plus I Pressure Plate with a Steel Back Segmented Kevlar disc. This clutch is designed for the ultimate street enthusiast or weekend racer running a normally aspirated car equipped with cylinder head work and/or hotter cam(s), or with medium-boost turbo or super-charger, or up to 100hp NO2. The FX300 features only slightly increased pedal pressure, long life disc and positive engagement.

kit3.jpg

btw.. the HPDE Subaru, Honda, and Evo guys love this clutch which is why i'm comfortable becoming the NSX guinea pig again.
 
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Have read some different reviews stating that people have been running the stock clutch with their FI system. Is there a HP to stay under if going to use the stock clutch?

You shouldn't limit your HP because of the clutch because you're going to want more power later down the line.

If you're semi building the motor and getting FI installed just get a new clutch when everything is out.

Pro's to getting aftermarket clutch installed
1. Handle your power
2. Probably less in labor since a lot of things will be disconnected
3. Save you another tune unless you get 2 tunes set-up at once
4. If you're stock clutch is in good condition re-sell it for some cash

If you're not having the motor pulled and using a stock motor you're most likely be only able to reach a certain whp and would be I guess fine with a stock clutch. However my stock clutch slipped at low 400whp.

Cons to getting aftermarket clutch
1. Initial price
2. Paying full labor of pulling everything off
3. Getting re-tuned for more power since you have a new clutch you'll probably want more power.
4. The feeling that your old aftermarket clutch is slipping and could go at any time...
 
Since I went with the SOS 6 puck, I'm glad it can handle 22psi!

5psi was the maximum with the stock clutch.
8Psi was the maximum with the old Sos clutch sport
22psi was the maximum with the SoS 6puck clutch
 
my sos clutch is holding up at 437 whp
 
I have a clutch master 6 puck on my turbo nsx. I believe Is the FX400. Its rated for 170% over stock so it holds the power very well. If i remember correctly its wasnt stupid expensive either.. maybe 1800-1900. I probably have about 30k on it with 2 track days
 
Dont do it... You will be replacing your clutch in 3 mos or less. You may say you running low boost but that will still eat up your clutch.
 
Have read some different reviews stating that people have been running the stock clutch with their FI system. Is there a HP to stay under if going to use the stock clutch?

Keep in mind there are two completly different stock clutches, the older 91-96 twin disk and the newer 97+ single disk. The two have different power levels. You can install almost any of the after market clutches on the newer 97+ cars but some of the older clutch designs require the output shaft to be changed on the trans and that can be a lot of work and money. We have more and more clutch options these days so changing the output shaft should not really be needed to get a good aftermarket clutch.

The OEM 91-94 twin disks in my expierence have a lower torque limit than the newer single disk OEM clutch. My 91 had a Hi-Boost CTSC and the stock clutch would not hold it was about 270wTQ, that clutch was replaced with a PowerGrip II and I had no issues with that clutch at that power level.

The 97+ single disk clutches seem to be able to handle more TQ than the OEM twins. I have an 04 on the stock clutch and it will hold 300wTQ in gears 1-4 but 5th at full song is not going to hold. I have run the 04 stock clutch up to 325wTQ but it will not hold the shift from 2-3 or 3-4 at that TQ level. It will hold a full pull in both 2nd, 3rd, and even 4th, but not the high RPM shift that the 6 speeds offer. This clutch is being replaced with the SOS Sport 6-puc in the next week or so and I will be back on my steet tune and running 330wTQ to the tire and 440whp.

When you pick a clutch to replace your OEM (and you will) most are rated at flywheel TQ not wheel TQ so make sure you factor that into your decision. If you are staying around the 400whp/300wTQ range there are lots of clutches to choose and most are priced below the OEM clutch price.

Hope this helps,

Dave
 
Have read some different reviews stating that people have been running the stock clutch with their FI system. Is there a HP to stay under if going to use the stock clutch?

I have a different opinion about this... keep the stock clutch as long as it works as you increase hp. when it breaks, you will know more about your car, its hp, your future goals about hp...and you probably will know much more about clutches because of your experience.
cheers,
bruce
 
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