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AEM ECU CTSC high boost base map?

Joined
8 November 2003
Messages
2,412
Location
Portland OR
Hi all,
I am set to do an AEM install on my 3.0l 1991, using a Comptech high boost pulley supercharger, 550 injectors, Walbro fuel pump, AEM FPR, dual wide band A/F. I know there have been a few out there with this same set up and I am looking to get a base map for this set up so Tourqe Freaks here in Portland have some where to start on the dyno tuning. Nothing specific on the AEM forum, can any one on prime help me out?

Will post results when I get the tuning done, set for the 24th of May!
 
If i remember correctly I believe there was a map on the AEM Forum.

Ken
 
Talk to Sean at Torque Freaks, I am sure he has my original maps, might work for you as a base map. Boost is Boost


good luck
Armadno
 
The closer I can find a car with the same set up, the safer the start up is and the less time it takes to do the final tune. The map on the AEM forum will allow me to start the car, just looking for something better.

Anyone out there?
 
At the time Sean tuned my car other than the Basch/Comptech difference, I was running the same set up, 550 injectors, Walbro fuel pump,AEM fpr and their dual wideband, boost was about 7.5 to 8 lbs.


Armando
 
MiamieNeSeX said:
At the time Sean tuned my car other than the Basch/Comptech difference, I was running the same set up, 550 injectors, Walbro fuel pump,AEM fpr and their dual wideband, boost was about 7.5 to 8 lbs.


Armando

Thanks for the input, the Novi SC builds boost in a linear manner, boost rises along with the RPM. The Whipple SC is at full boost at 2500 RPM and starts to drop off at 7500 RPM. The fuel requirements are tied to the boost and RPM so the map should be quite different, plus timing will be pulled at lower RPM with the Whipple/Comptech SC because of the higher boost at lower RPM.

I am sure Sean and John at Tourque Freaks will do a fine job, just trying to help the project along :wink:
 
titaniumdave said:
Thanks for the input, the Novi SC builds boost in a linear manner, boost rises along with the RPM. The Whipple SC is at full boost at 2500 RPM and starts to drop off at 7500 RPM. The fuel requirements are tied to the boost and RPM so the map should be quite different, plus timing will be pulled at lower RPM with the Whipple/Comptech SC because of the higher boost at lower RPM.


If the fuel map covers the full boost range and is done correctly/completely then the full range of “fuel requirements” is covered. The map is a grid with axis of load (vacuum-boost) and RPM and cell values of fuel. With all cells correctly populated it will work for any combination of those two represented in the graph. Mind you I'm not saying a map from one car will be perfect in another. Differences such as injectors and base fuel pressure are big items but if those are the same you'll be close enough as a starting point whether it's a Whipple, Vortex, turbo or whatever. In reality most SCs are probably tuned at WOT and optimized only for the most commonly hit cells dialed in then extrapolated to fill in the rest of the map. So again the best you can expect is a reasonable starting point and a good tuner can get you that far from the delivered base map really fast anyway. Timing maps are similar in design (axis of load and RPM with cells representing degrees BTDC) and probably get even less detailed tuning outside the normal operating range.

In other words, I’d start with maps from a similar car if I could get them and knew who created them, but it shouldn’t be a big deal with a qualified tuner.
 
sjs said:
If the fuel map covers the full boost range and is done correctly/completely then the full range of “fuel requirements” is covered. The map is a grid with axis of load (vacuum-boost) and RPM and cell values of fuel. With all cells correctly populated it will work for any combination of those two represented in the graph. Mind you I'm not saying a map from one car will be perfect in another. Differences such as injectors and base fuel pressure are big items but if those are the same you'll be close enough as a starting point whether it's a Whipple, Vortex, turbo or whatever. In reality most SCs are probably tuned at WOT and optimized only for the most commonly hit cells dialed in then extrapolated to fill in the rest of the map. So again the best you can expect is a reasonable starting point and a good tuner can get you that far from the delivered base map really fast anyway. Timing maps are similar in design (axis of load and RPM with cells representing degrees BTDC) and probably get even less detailed tuning outside the normal operating range.

In other words, I’d start with maps from a similar car if I could get them and knew who created them, but it shouldn’t be a big deal with a qualified tuner.

Great info sjs. I'd also add that, although people ask about the fuel map the most when talking of aem configs, it's also important to get all the other parameters in a known 'working' state for your car/mods. The biggest problem I've had with my map (when i bought it, it came with a 'base' config for the blower/injectors/wideband etc) is everything EXCEPT the fuel map. There are so many god damn options, and it's hard to quick see what the proper setting/value is for your car and mods.

I'm still finding stuff that wasn't properly setup when this unit was installed on another nsx... I too would like someone to supply a known good map from autowave or one of the other known good nsx tuners who has the same or similar mods as myself.

I don't want/need the EXACT config because I think it will immediately make my car perfectly tuned, I just want to make sure all the proper settings are configured (ie knock sensors, input/outputs etc). That way I can finally get on with the fine tuning, instead of double checking every god damn option by hand, and then researching and trying to figure out what it should be given my modifications.

Since I think a lot of folks with the aem just pay the money and have someone else install and tune it (not that there is anything wrong with that), if you were not aware, you can connect a notebook via a serial cable and download the current config/map. You don't need to ask your tuner for the map.

If anyone is interested in sharing their maps, and aren't sure how to pull it, please PM or email me and I'll walk you through it. If you're in the bay area, you can stop by my shop in milpitas (evenings/weekends) and I'll pull it for you and make you and myself a copy.

Cheers,

-mike
 
Here is an update with my AEM install/tuning project. I spent all day Sunday installing the set up on my low boost CTSC set up. I was pretty happy to only need to chase parts once for the whole day and it was the fuel system which was the most challenging.

I started with the pulley and injectors, figured get the dirty stuff out of the way. As long as I was digging in there I put new drive belt in too! The pulley is very straight forward, loosen the 4 bolts, loosen the adjuster, remove the 4 bolts and let the belt fall out of the way, then remove the alternator. I left all the drive stuff off to give me more finger room to get to the injectors. As long as I was digging in, I took the time to pull the fuel rails and flush them with injector cleaner, check all the hoses and connectors. The RC engineering injectors use a different seal then the stock injectors, didn't know this going in. The diameter of the end which sticks in the manifold is smaller than the stock injectors, plus the over all height from base to fuel rail is different too. I was able to buy a universal honda injector seal kit which came with o-ring and a short and tall seal. The stock injectors use a short seal with a plastic spacer mounted in the hole below the seal. The tall seal seems to work OK with the RC injector, with the plastic spacers removed.

The next step with the fuel system was swapping the rising rate fuel pressure reg for a 1:1 fuel pressure reg. I chose an AEM universal FPR for the job. It is a tiny part, about 1/4 the size of the Comptech unit, but it has a simular mounting pattern for the holes and I was able to use the Comptech 'L' bracket and all the Comptech lines and fitting to bolt right into it. The only parts I needed get were 2 plugs for the holes I was not using, second fuel rail return and the tap for a gauge. The FPR came with 3 different size return orifice(s), I was going to use the middle size, but broke the damn thing off using the torque spec in the manual, ended up using the largest one. It is pretty easy to change if this gives me problems, so what the hell. Plus with the Walbro 255 pump(already installed), there should be no problem with the getting enough fuel.

With the fuel sytem done, I went ahead and wove the new belt into place, installed the smaller pulley and tightened it. Next was the alternator and to tension the belt with the adjuster, once that was in place I checked the 4 bolts on the pulley to make sure they were tight, now I had the belt to keep the pulley from spinning.

Next step was the wide band O2 sensor and UEGO, I chose the dual wide band so I could keep tabs on both banks individually to hopefully prevent problems and be able to fine tune the A/F. Since you can tune each injector individually, the more info I have the more accurate the map can be, if I choose to go there. The wide band sensors perfectly replaced the stock ones, and for the first time in all my exhaust work, nothing was frozen! I pulled all the stock wires and the Competch extension cord back as far as I could so there is nothing extra wires hanging in the engine compartment. I put the UEGO controller inside the passenger compartment, pushed the rubber plug for the engine harness out and passed the 2 wires for the sensors through the hole for the plug. I ran the wires through the engine compartment and along the same route as the stock wires, over the rear head valve cover and down to the headers. Once the plugs were connected, I snugged up the wires and zipped tied them up and away from the headers, pulling some of the slack back into the passenger compartment. I slit the edge of the rubber harness plug, cutting it about half way to the harness wires, cutting from the center out to the edge on the passenger side of the car. I really wish I had thought about this before I put the alternator back, but I got it done and didn't even cut myself! I was able to push the wires for the sensors into the cut and then work the plug back into the hole in the firewall. Made a pretty neat set up and a decent seal. It was hard enough to get it all back in am sure it will stay. At this point I removed the stock ECU, left the 5 plugs hanging loose. Next was to make the connections to the wire harness and power/ground. The chassis ground is right next to the wire harness hole, AEM recommends a dedicated line to the battery ground, but I was tired and figured I will jumper the line later if I have problems(or never). I chose to use a pin off the AEM ECU for 12 volt power(B1), we will see if this is a good idea in the long run. The 2 wires for the O2 input into the ECU need to replace the stock O2 pins, so I soldered pins on the UEGO wide band output wires, pushed the stock pins out of the harness plugs and pushed the new ones into place.

The new ECU comes with a jumper to connect the Vtec harness into the 4 large connectors on the passenger side of the ECU and deletes the small connector on the driver side. This new jumper's pins are pushed into 2 empty holes in 2 of the connectors and plugged into the connector leading back to the Vtec spool valves. The AEM ECU pretty much squeezes into the hole where the stock ECU fit, with just enough room to connect the serial cable, put some velcro on the back and push into place. Once the box was in place, I connected the 4 harness plugs, connected a lap top and uploaded the start up map from the supplied software. The upload has some simple instructions to set the throttle limits and timing.

It started the first time, I let it warm up and drove to see Sean at Torque Freaks to get some real dyno tuning.

I am making this post mostly to clear this experience out of my head, this was a long 8 hour+ day. I am happy with the results and will post the dyno numbers when I get the car back later this week. I am leaving the car at Torque Freaks for a few days so they can do cold start tweaks on it after it has sat for a few days.

I will also post the map, once complete, for others to use as a base.
 
I'm about to get my car to my local tuner he is an AEM certified but I know he has a lots of experience doing 4 cylinder Hondas and Acuras but he has not done any NSX's or 6 cylinder engine.

My setup: Whipple CTSC low boost but about order the small high boost pulley, Aeromotive Tsunami pump, 1:1 FPR, 440cc injectors, AEM EMS and AEM dual wideband.

My question here is, if it will be OK to try get AEM MAP similar to my setup to be use by my non-NSX experienced tuner as a staring point.

If so, is there someone that can help me with this I'm willing to Paypal for it, please PM if you can help.

Sorry did not mean to hijack the thread.
 
I'm about to get my car to my local tuner he is an AEM certified but I know he has a lots of experience doing 4 cylinder Hondas and Acuras but he has not done any NSX's or 6 cylinder engine.

My setup: Whipple CTSC low boost but about order the small high boost pulley, Aeromotive Tsunami pump, 1:1 FPR, 440cc injectors, AEM EMS and AEM dual wideband.

My question here is, if it will be OK to try get AEM MAP similar to my setup to be use by my non-NSX experienced tuner as a staring point.

If so, is there someone that can help me with this I'm willing to Paypal for it, please PM if you can help.

Sorry did not mean to hijack the thread.

check you pm
 
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