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Engine blipping during down shifting...

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How many of you here do it? I watched a Japanese Best Motoring video yesterday and noticed that all the drivers were doing it. I just got my NSX last month and am interested in learning more advanced driving techniques. The video was explaining various turn timing and strategy for the Suzuka course. At the end of the video they had a full on race with these cars:
Ferrari 355, NSX Type-S, Mitsubishi Lancer Evo VII, RX-7 RS, Skyline GT-R Vspec, Subaru WRX ???, Ferrari 550 Maranello. The poll position was the two Ferraris I believe.
The winning order was:
NSX, 355, Lancer, RX-7, Skyline, 550, WRX

In any case, how do you think I should practice engine blipping and is it really necessary on a stock NSX?
 
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First of all, can you send me a copy of the video Kenji!

Secondly - take your car on a road course and you'll see that there is really a whole lot to learn - engine blipping to match throttle is just one part of it. I blip on the street just for effect - it sounds nice when you have an exhaust and you can downshift without any jerkiness.

It's not really necessary unless you downshift a lot and you want to take it a little easier on your clutch. For the track, you're blipping the throttle while you're braking.
 

Lud

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If you are using the higher RPM range of the car you need to blip the throttle on downshifts if you want them to be smooth. The goal is to match the engine RPM to what it will be when you release the clutch. The way to learn is... practice. It will become second nature.
 

Edo

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Lud is absolutely correct, I used to "attempt" to practice on several of my older cars until I decided that it wasnt worth it, and too difficult. Just recently I got back from Bondurant's 4 day grand Prix class. The first day was spent driving one way, and "Heel-Toe Downshifting" Turning around, and doing it again. It is VERY useful when coming into corners at high speeds, as it is detrimental to the balance of the car to downshift normally. In either case, I am sure there are people here that could explain it far better than I can. Btw, which Best Motoring Video # is that? I need to go out and get that!!
 
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I probably do it every day. Not just for the fun but because it give me smoother shifts and it makes the shifter go into the gate so much easier. (It does sound cool though) Perfection will come with time, so I obviously have not spent enought time :)

It is best to start blipping the throttle with downshifts one gear at a time. 5th to 4th , 4th to 3rd. etc. When you get good at that you will be able to tell when you can blip the throttle, be in the lower gear and simply let off the clutch w/o hesitation or worry that you are going to get a jerky shift. ( this should not take long...)

Next attempt a 2 gear downshift, 3 gears is obviously in your future.

I only have a 5 speed so I don't do 5 to 1 downshifts. If you have a 6 speed that may be a different story since you can do a 6 to 2. At this point however I think you should be double clutching since it really does make it easier.

HTH

jeff
 
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In any case, how do you think I should practice engine blipping and is it really necessary on a stock NSX?[/B][/QUOTE]


Not necessary, but if you want to be a better driver overall and have any ambition of driving at the track or just being smooth on open mountain roads you should learn it. Basically, the technique is simple, while your braking depress the clutch and then roll your foot so that it blips the throttle and then downshift and let the clutch out. Of course there are many variables but practice makes perfect. Your goal should be to achieve quick downshifts that both braking and shifting do not unsettle the car. It should all feel smooth, and if you do it right the sound and feeling will give you a woody! Remember, it is done to keep your engine in the power band at all times so if your your pussy footing around forget it.
 
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I always blip the throttle and heal and toe for smoother downshifts and because it sounds really cool. Heal and toe downshifts are a big plus especially at high RPMs, alot of time can be made up on the track and also its less wear and tear on the clutch and gearbox, on the street or track other cars have no chance in keeping up through the corners if the drivers don't know how to heal and toe.
 
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The only thing that could cause damage is if you double clutch and inadvertantly let out the clutch when in gear (when you are in the rev stage)

For rev matching, nothing really bad will happen. If you do it really badly you will have make your synchros work *more* , not what you are trying to do. Other than that you will be fine
 
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Hey Kenji! Practice heel/toe and rev-matching on your Mister... get it fixed yet?
 
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I think we're all missing the point here. Yes, blipping the throttle sounds cool, and matching revs is important to enjoy long transmission life. But when driving in a "spirited" manner (ie. on the track), smoothness is everything. If you've ever dumped the clutch in a botched downshift and heard the tires chirp and felt the rear end get unsettled you know how serious this can be. If you are on a track and entering a corner at, say 90 mph, and brake to settle the front end and scrub some speed, your downshift to (probably) 2nd gear had better be smooth so you don't disturb the delicate balance of your (now probably) 75 mph $50,000.00 cornering projectile. Keeping those gears, and therefore the wheels, at the same rpm ensures that the pointy end stays in front and, more importantly, the shiny side stays up!
Practice your heel-toe downshifts often. The price of a clutch is far better than the cost of a new NSX. Better yet, rent a car and practice on that!

[This message has been edited by ChopsJazz (edited 19 June 2000).]
 
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