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After Supercharger oil problems

Joined
7 May 2012
Messages
11
Hello,
I'm from Germany and I just me on my NSX NA1 Superchargerkit built an SOS.
After I've had bad experiences with the Piggy Pack of AEM and have now switched to the AEM EMS I unfortunately still a big problem.
After a rather poor result was unfortunately the stand out performance checks (327PS) at full load I have an increased oil output from the crankcase breather.
As a solution, I had installed a Oilcatchtank first and had no problems with oil on my air filter, since it was partially soaked in oil.
Well yesterday I had on a full load of smoke and it pushes out oil from the valve cover gaskets. Thus it seems to me to be too large in any case, the pressure in the crankcase.
Do you think this is due to the oil control rings, the piston or the result will come at once?

Thank you for your help in advance schonmal.

Best regards Maik
 
It doesn't sound good, but have you vented BOTH of the cam covers to the oil catch tank ?
For the front cam cover don't forget to remove the one-way valve!
Does the oil catch tank fill up with oil?
I'm not familiar with the SOS supercharger but on my turbo system, the catch tank is not connected to the engine inlet so there is no risk of getting oil on the air filter...
 
I would perform a leak down test. My engine and batmans both had exessive oil from the rear valve cover. When the engine's were torn down the pistons were found cracked.
 
Hello,
I've done both of the valve cover vents with T-pieces to the oil collection tank and then led to two shots in the compressor, so even with the inclusion in the connection between the air filter box and throttle and then the other straight back to the compressor housing.
I just do not know which way valve do you mean? Have you otherwise is a picture of?
In the oil collecting container is collected in any case, the oil and when the full load was full almost got it then raus.Ist real from the valve cover gaskets shame because my NSX has used before the supercharger conversion does not drip oil :-( And now he hits the oil yes really out en masse.

A compression test, I can only start on the weekend.

Most affected are the rear three cylinders and the rear piece of the engine. I sprayed the oil up to the rear of the engine

I really hope that you can help me here, because the NSX is a true exotic car here in Germany and a supercharger conversion here on the NSX is still rare, unfortunately. Since only a few may have done me any help here in Germany.
 
It's not too easy to understand your english but here are the pictures of my oil catch tank.
I used a garden hose 90° bend for the front cam cover pick up point.
I'm a member of the European NSX club ( http://www.nsx.ch/de/) and there are many members from Germany with a lot of experience of the NSX.
I will try to get you their names:smile:
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Sorry for my bad English.
Since I myself is not so good english, can I use the Google translator * ashamed *
If the image on the first check valve to be sitting directly on the valve cover? Or what is meant by non-return valve?
Thanks in advance for the quick responses.
 
The non return valve is a one way valve.
It should be used only when it's connected to a vacuum source like the engine inlet otherwise it will block the pressure created inside the engine.
The contact I have in Germany is Markus Fugel.
His site is http://www.honda-fugel.de/
 
hi Maik --

Is your engine factory, or has it been modified?

You said it has a ScienceofSpeed supercharger, but your intake tube looks to be from a turbocharged NSX.

Crankcase pressure on the NSX on the dyno / in street use should not be an issue. What you describe sounds like the crankcase may be high - which may be issues with pressure loss past the engine's piston rings. A compression & leakdown test will verify this. In the meantime, you can look at your manifold pressure under idle once the engine is fully warmed up. Let us know the pressure (either with a gauge or by reading the EMS output).

-- Chris
 
That's cb72 engine not his, like chris said get a gauge see how vacuum ur engine pull at idle( fully warm up). It should be around 21 or 22 inches, anything lower than 15 inches u might have worn or crack ring land. Open and close throttle quickly if it drop to 2 inches then jump to 23 or 24( healthy engine) if it drops to 0 then jumps to 20 inches u might have worn ring or crack ring land
 
Hello Chris.

Pictures from the engine compartment, I have shown at all. These are CB72s Turbo NSX.

Here is my engine compartment (there was not yet installed the Oilcatchtank)



I'll make this week even with a compression test.
 
At the weekend I checked the engine compression. However, first with a * relative * measure compression tester our GUTMANN (On the ripple current from the starter) 4 of 6 had too little compression. Once I make it I'll get out the first 3 candles and measure the exact compression with a compression gauge.

Only for understanding how the piston rings for now due to the higher pressure broke?
 
At the weekend I checked the engine compression. However, first with a * relative * measure compression tester our GUTMANN (On the ripple current from the starter) 4 of 6 had too little compression. Once I make it I'll get out the first 3 candles and measure the exact compression with a compression gauge.

Only for understanding how the piston rings for now due to the higher pressure broke?
I will let the experts answer but I believe it must be due to detonation.
Eitheir you burn a whole in the piston or the rings break:mad:
The question is : how and who did you engine mapping???
If your Air to Fuel ratio was too lean or your ignition was too advanced....the big problems start.
I tuned the standalone AEM on my turbocharged engine through e-mails with the supplier ( LoveFab).
After 4 e-mails it was done ( thanks Cody!)
 
Thanks in advance for the answer.

I also got the impression that it was voting on it but that would be detected first. Levels found here in Germany to find someone who is familiar with voting is really hard.

But maybe my engine was the 0.7 bar too much in his old days.

Now before me is nothing else but to overtake him.
 
At the weekend I checked the engine compression. However, first with a * relative * measure compression tester our GUTMANN (On the ripple current from the starter) 4 of 6 had too little compression. Once I make it I'll get out the first 3 candles and measure the exact compression with a compression gauge.

Only for understanding how the piston rings for now due to the higher pressure broke?
Did you measure the compression again? I've a very cheap tool for this like this one: http://www.ebay.de/itm/Kompressions...82148918?pt=Elektrogeräte&hash=item53e8733136

I don't think your engine (even though I don't know it's mileage and history) is too old and went BOOM because of 0.7 bar. It's more likely that the mapping was wrong. Please sort that out before you go BOOM with a revised engine again. Did you run an AFR-gauge? Very recommended.
 
I would perform a leak down test. My engine and batmans both had exessive oil from the rear valve cover. When the engine's were torn down the pistons were found cracked.

I'm starting to think that any NSX engine - namely an OEM one that requires an oil catch can should have it's compression/leak down test checked.

I haven't had ANY issues after my rebuild and have been going WOT and no need for that bandage to a larger problem.
 
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