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Great car, not available in the U.S.

As the article said, about 50% of the cars in Europe are diesel.

And most of Europe is way greener that the States, so I find it curious that diesel is not only shunned, but actually illegal to use in a car in some parts of the US.

A friend of mine has a couple of years old VW Polo, He gets about 60mpg I guess. (it is a diesel).

Interesting article.

Did you know that when you have a diesel powered car in Europe, the yearly road tax is about double the cost? (not in the UK but in most other countries in Europe) and still 50% of the cars on the road in Europe are diesels.
 
I thought Mercedes, BMW and VW diesel are already available in the US, can't be that hard for other carmaker to make their diesel legal too?

Carguy how's your search for a McLaren F1 going? I've been watching them coming up for sale in the US and then disappearing quite fast :eek: there's a silver one at Euro-classics for sale at the moment.
http://www.classicdriver.net/de/find/4100_results.asp?&dealerid=11548&lCarID=1764629
 
Wow, I have to agree. That is a great looking car-especially for Ford. I would consider that were it available in the U.S.
 
I thought Mercedes, BMW and VW diesel are already available in the US, can't be that hard for other carmaker to make their diesel legal too?

The 5 states that are the most strict are VERY difficult to conform to. It took VW and MB about 5 years to do it. This (2009) is the first year they made it happen. The urea based system from MB needs to be refilled about every 7500 miles at the dealership. You get a few starts with the car after it is dry but then the car is un-driveable.

BMW has never had a diesel in the US, that I know of. They ARE brining it in the 3 and 5 series (X too?) for 2009 but only with auto. GEEZ.
 
I seem to recall that EU cars use high sulfur content diesel which, at idle, won't meet our emissions. That's why US diesels don't do nearly as well, and EU ones won't work over here.
 
I'm also hoping to see more diesel cars available from manufactures soon. The VW Jetta and Golf TDi version are available as a 2009 model... they get like 45mpg i think combined, have less emissions than a Prius, cheaper, better to drive, and have a better build quality... basically car and driver said it was a no brainer to purchase it over the prius.

Also keep in mind that the Euro Gallon is different (and bigger) than the U.S. Gallon so the MPG figures are going to be slightly optimistic over what we would see stateside.
 
Ford's claim for too "Expansive" for the states side is bull, they can manufacture the car here and import just the engine.

Another blunder by Found On the Road Dead.
 
i just picked up a new beater. 1981 vw rabbit diesel. it's the slowest thing i've ever driven in my whole life but it gets 47mpg combined hwy/city. i've always been a fan of diesel engines. they're low maintenance, indestructable, and good mpg. my first car was/is a 1987 mbz 300D, this thing has close to 300k miles and is still running strong and being driven daily by my dad. i refuse to sell this car because one day i'll restore this sucker. not to mention all of the memories in the back seat...:wink:

i'm wondering if the 1series diesel bimmer is coming to the states. that is the only car my dad would consider buying new. 67mpg is tempting.
 
i have a question somewhat related.


why is there not bio diesol for sale everywhere? doesnt that seem like a reasnoable short time sollution.



and that sucks for ford that they would have to sell it for 25k just to break even, diesel costs about 50 cents more per gallon that premium, 75 ish more than low grade gasoline:rolleyes:
 
why is there not bio diesol for sale everywhere? doesnt that seem like a reasnoable short time sollution.

Not enough demand in the US. The majority is produced in Europe because there are so many diesels.

With just 3% of the market in the US, I don't think its cost effective.

So you have the chicken and the egg.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biodiesel
 
I also don't get how these new cars tout "high mpg" at like 28mpg or something... what kind of crap is that?

I have a 1994 Mercury Tracer that I use as a beater and the damn thing gets 36-37mpg...

Apparently we've gone backwards with our MPG figures. I guess its all due to added weight of all the safety systems these days?
 
I also don't get how these new cars tout "high mpg" at like 28mpg or something... what kind of crap is that?

I have a 1994 Mercury Tracer that I use as a beater and the damn thing gets 36-37mpg...

Apparently we've gone backwards with our MPG figures. I guess its all due to added weight of all the safety systems these days?

Its all about weight.
 
I "testdrove" an 2009 VW Jetta TDI while at a track event last wknd. It was a dealer's car. The car was very very impressive. It had just a bit of "clatter" on start up with no exhaust fumes. It sounded like a gas car when driven. The TQ was impressive. The dealer rep(who was an instructor at the track event) stated that was giving mid 40's per gallon. The car isn't out yet and he had 44 orders already.

IMHO diesels would be a much better choice that Hybrids. If VW/MB can do it then why can't US makers?
 
After reading the article, I have to wonder about the cost issue they mention. I mean, unless there are some sort of rules regarding where components have to be made, possibly for tax reasons, it can't cost that much to just bring the engines over. Enough people do it with used JDM engines for Nissan 240's, so how bad could it be for a factory that already has a network in place for moving materials around the world?

Maybe I'm missing something.

Nick
 
Ford plans to make a gas-powered version of the Fiesta in Mexico for the U.S. So why not manufacture diesel engines there, too? Building a plant would cost at least $350 million at a time when Ford has been burning through more than $1 billion a month in cash reserves. Besides, the automaker would have to produce at least 350,000 engines a year to make such a venture profitable. "We just don't think North and South America would buy that many diesel cars," says Fields.

After reading the article, I have to wonder about the cost issue they mention. I mean, unless there are some sort of rules regarding where components have to be made, possibly for tax reasons, it can't cost that much to just bring the engines over. Enough people do it with used JDM engines for Nissan 240's, so how bad could it be for a factory that already has a network in place for moving materials around the world?

Maybe I'm missing something.

Nick
 
Right, I saw that. So obviously, they have _a_ factory down south. Also obviously, they don't have the ability to make diesel engines there, and they can't justify that investment.

Here's the question. Does it really cost that much to build extra diesel engines at the factory in Europe, and ship them to Mexico so they can be bolted into the chassis coming off the gas production line?

It would cost a lot to build the entire diesel car in Europe and ship it across the Atlantic, sure. This sounds more like they just don't want to bother, like when they offered all models of the Focus with a manual except the wagon. My dad would have bought one, but he'd be the only one.

Nick
 
I haven't heard someone what I THINK is the obvious.. it's b/c of the expensive DOT certification and emission certification.

In other words - it's the damn government and SIERA club getting in the way. Imagine that - the government and environmental fascist Nazi's making hurting not only people and the economy but also the environment.

If it's a right-wing conspiracy, please correct me.
 
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